Skip to content

Stress Management Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

4 Stress-Busting Moves You Can Do Anytime

Got a few minutes? Take a break from holiday hassles.
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Quick quiz: You're ready to scream after the end of a hectic workday, but a long list of must-do holiday tasks still looms ahead. You fight traffic to get to the mall -- where someone cuts you off to grab the last parking space. You need stress relief and you need it NOW. What's your best option?

A. Scarf down the box of chocolates you've been saving for just such an emergency.
B. Go home and melt into a hot bath.
C. Head to the day spa for a pampering massage.
D. Hit the gym and crank out 20 minutes on the treadmill.

The answer: D. We don't recommend such intensive chocolate therapy. And while massages and long soaks in the tub may feel great, exercise is the best de-stressor over the long term, experts say.

Recommended Related to Stress Management

The Healing Power of Touch

By Andrea Cooper These four hands-on therapies can ease your stress, anxiety, pain, and more. Read on to find the best remedy for you. Several years ago, Mike, my psychologist, urged me to see someone else for help in dealing with my stress. But he wasn’t referring me to another talk therapist. He thought I should try some sessions with Dana, a massage therapist specially trained to treat trauma victims. I had been abused as a child, and Mike thought that Dana might help me through...

Read the The Healing Power of Touch article > >

Along with the well-known physical benefits, exercise has been shown to "increase one's sense of well-being, mood state, self-esteem, stress responsivity, (and) body image, as well as decreased depression and anxiety," says Jesse Pittsley, PhD, a spokesperson for the American Society for Exercise Physiologists.

Just what is it about exercise that makes a person feel good (other than those toned abs)? And what are the best moves to do when you're feeling stressed, especially when time is at a premium? Three experts gave WebMD some answers.

The Stress Response

"The human body has evolved over the centuries. While we were designed to use our large muscles in difficult environments -- hunting, defending ourselves against enemies, enduring the harshness of weather, the problem is we don't live that way any more," says C. Eugene Walker, a professor of psychology at the University of Oklahoma. "We are very sedentary, and our problems are more mental and social rather than physical."

So when we encounter stressful situations, the result is pent-up physical reactions, says Walker, author of Learn to Relax: Proven Techniques for Reducing Stress, Tension, and Anxiety -- and Promoting Peak Performance.

"It's like driving a Ferrari in a 20 mph speed limit," says Walker. "When (we are) presented with a stressful situation, adrenaline is released into the bloodstream, our muscles get tense as we prepare to react, blood pressure is increased, and breathing becomes shallow and rapid."

"Essentially, we are stressed mentally, which doesn't require a physical response. We are stepping on the gas and the brake at the same time, producing fatigue, tension, stress, and over time, chronic diseases like heart disease."

The solution: Regular exercise.

"Basically, when we exercise, we get back to what our bodies were designed to do," says Walker. "We increase our heart rate, take in more oxygen, our blood circulates better and faster."

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

Hands breaking pencil in frustration
Quiz
stethoscope and dollars
Article
 
Woman with stressed, fatigue
Article
fatigued woman
Article
 
hand gripping green rubber ball
Article
family counseling
Video
 
stress at work
Article
frayed rope
Quiz
 

Pollen counts, treatment tips, and more.

It's nothing to sneeze at.

Loading ...

Sending your email...

This feature is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Thanks!

Now check your email account on your mobile phone to download your new app.

WebMD Special Sections