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Stress Management - If You Need More Help

Stress can be hard to deal with on your own. It's okay to seek help if you need it. Talk with your doctor about the stress you're feeling and how it affects you. A licensed counselor or other health professional can help you find ways to reduce stress symptoms. He or she can also help you think about ways to reduce stress in your life.

A counselor or health professional is useful for:

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By Tara Rummell BersonGo from keyed-up to calm with these easy tactics. Whether you're anxious about the hectic holiday season, frustrated by an endless list of chores, or upset over an argument with a loved one, you don't have to let stress get the best of you. All you need is five minutes to escape life's frantic pace and regain your composure. Here, quick tips for conquering stress in your most distressing moments from Jeffrey Brantley, M.D., coauthor of Five Good Minutes at Work and director...

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  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). CBT teaches you to be aware of how you perceive stress. It helps you understand that the way you think about stress affects your response to it. CBT helps you create and use skills to deal with stress. (See tips for finding a counselor or therapist.)
  • Biofeedback. This technique teaches you how to use your mind to control skin temperature, muscle tension, heart rate, or blood pressure. All of these things can be affected by stress. Learning biofeedback requires training in a special lab or a doctor's office.
  • Hypnosis. With hypnosis, you take suggestions that may help you change the way you act. It's important to find a health professional with a lot of training and experience. Some psychologists, counselors, doctors, and dentists know how to use hypnosis.

Treatment for other health problems

You may need treatment for other emotional problems related to stress, such as anxiety, depression, or insomnia. Treatment may include medicines or professional counseling.

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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: May 03, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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