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What You Should Know About Wrinkle Fillers

Autologous Wrinkle Fillers

Fat is the most commonly used substance in this category. Your own fat is surgically removed from your thighs, buttocks, or stomach, treated, then injected. You will need to have two procedures (one to remove the fat and one to inject it). Both procedures can be done in one visit. Additional fat purification steps done in the lab can be costly and time-consuming. Results can be semi-permanent, although you may need a series of injections done over time.

Platelet-rich plasma injections (“vampire lift”) are another type of autologous wrinkle filler/volumizer. Blood is drawn from the arm, treated, then injected into the face. The effects can last 12 to 18 months.

Risks are similar to other wrinkle fillers, including bruising, redness, and swelling at the site of the injection. Because the fillers come from your body, these injections do not require FDA approval.

Minimizing Risks and Increasing Good Outcomes for All Wrinkle Fillers

Wrinkle fillers are among the safest cosmetic procedures in use today. But there are things you can do to help ensure your treatment is safe:

  • Don't let price be your guide. If you are offered a wrinkle filler treatment that costs far less than the standard treatment, it's likely some compromises are being made, either in the skill of the provider or the quality of the product. Never risk making a bargain with your face.
  • All wrinkle fillers should be done in a medical setting with sterile instruments. Treatments done in homes, hotels, spas, or resorts are not being done in medical environments, regardless of who is doing them.
  • Do not get injectable wrinkle fillers from sources outside a doctor's office. Know what you are being injected with, and ask your doctor if an FDA-approved wrinkle filler is being used and if it was purchased directly from the maker. There have been reports of everything from industrial-grade silicone to baby oil being used. If a provider won't give you this information, don't let them do the procedure.
  • Use sunscreen daily to help preserve the filler and help protect against post-inflammatory pigment changes due to the needle sticks from injections.

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