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  • Question 1/13

    It's OK to sleep in your eye makeup.

  • Answer 1/13

    It's OK to sleep in your eye makeup.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Mascara can flake into your eyes while you sleep. You might wake up with itchy, bloodshot eyes, scratched corneas, or even an infection. Make sure to remove all makeup before you go to bed.

  • Question 1/13

    Which of the following may attract the sun's UV rays to your lips?

  • Answer 1/13

    Which of the following may attract the sun's UV rays to your lips?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Sheer, high-gloss lipsticks offer little protection and can attract damaging UV rays to your lips. If you want the wet look, apply an opaque lipstick first, then top with the gloss. Use a lip balm with at least SPF 30.

  • Question 1/13

    Nail polish may stain your nails.

  • Answer 1/13

    Nail polish may stain your nails.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Nail polish, particularly darker colors, may stain your fingernails or toenails and leave them yellowed and discolored. The stained nails will grow out, but it may take several months.

  • Question 1/13

    Hypoallergenic cosmetic products don’t cause allergic reactions.

  • Answer 1/13

    Hypoallergenic cosmetic products don’t cause allergic reactions.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Just because a product says it's hypoallergenic doesn't mean you won't have a reaction to it. The FDA doesn't have standards for using the term "hypoallergenic," so cosmetic makers don't have to prove their claims. Any product can be labeled "hypoallergenic" no matter what its ingredients, and no cosmetic product can be guaranteed not to cause an allergic reaction.

  • Question 1/13

    According to some experts, which product should you replace every three months?

  • Answer 1/13

    According to some experts, which product should you replace every three months?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Because of the risk of eye infections, you may not be able to use eye makeup, including mascara, eyeliner, and eye shadow, as long as you would other products. Liquid or creamy makeup can harbor bacteria more easily, so some experts recommend replacing your mascara every three months. If mascara dries out, don't add water or saliva to moisten it. That can introduce bacteria.

  • Answer 1/13

    Which of the following promotes bacterial growth in makeup?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Cosmetic brushes, sponges, and fingertips pick up bacteria and other germs from the skin, so sharing makeup can mean you're also sharing bacteria. (Moistening brushes with saliva makes this worse.) Extended exposure to light or heat can break down the preservatives that fight bacteria, so don't leave your makeup in a hot car. And don't use cosmetics if you have an eye infection like pinkeye. Throw away any makeup you were using when you discovered the infection.

  • Question 1/13

    Some lipsticks made in the U.S. contain lead.

  • Answer 1/13

    Some lipsticks made in the U.S. contain lead.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While some lipsticks do contain small amounts of lead, lipstick is intended for external use only, and you probably swallow only very small amounts of it. The FDA has concluded that lead levels in lipsticks aren't a safety concern.

  • Question 1/13

    Some eye makeup made in other countries contains hazardous levels of lead.

  • Answer 1/13

    Some eye makeup made in other countries contains hazardous levels of lead.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Kohl is a traditional type of eye makeup that can contain significant amounts of lead. It's not permitted for use as an additive in any cosmetic or FDA-regulated product in the U.S., but it has been advertised for mail order online.  Some types of eye makeup may be labeled with the term “kohl” to indicate the shade, but the product doesn’t actually contain kohl.

  • Question 1/13

    The FDA approves all cosmetics before they are sold to the public.

  • Answer 1/13

    The FDA approves all cosmetics before they are sold to the public.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A cosmetics maker can sell products without FDA approval. The FDA does not review or approve cosmetic products or any cosmetic ingredients, with the exception of color additives, which are required to have safety testing.

  • Question 1/13

    A cosmetics maker is required to report injuries caused by its products.

  • Answer 1/13

    A cosmetics maker is required to report injuries caused by its products.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The FDA doesn't require cosmetics makers to submit information about any injuries caused by their products and doesn't issue cosmetics recalls, though it can request recalls by the manufacturer. It also monitors ongoing recalls. A product can be taken off the market only if the FDA proves in court that it is dangerous or breaks the law.

  • Answer 1/13

    Which of the following is the most common injury from cosmetics?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Scratching the eye with a mascara wand is the most common cosmetics-related injury. It can lead to an eye infection if the scratches go untreated, and infections can result in ulcers on the cornea, eyelash loss, or even blindness. To avoid this type of injury, don't try to apply mascara while driving or riding in a moving vehicle.

  • Question 1/13

    A manufacturer that claims a cosmetic has medicinal benefits may be breaking the law.

  • Answer 1/13

    A manufacturer that claims a cosmetic has medicinal benefits may be breaking the law.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    “Cosmeceutical” is a popular term for a product that's meant to beautify but also treats a condition. However, the FDA classifies a product as either a cosmetic or a drug based on its intended use; it doesn’t recognize any category that’s a combination of the two. A company that associates a drug claim with a product the FDA has classified as a cosmetic may be violating federal law.

  • Question 1/13

    There is no hard evidence linking the use of cosmetics with cancer.

  • Answer 1/13

    There is no hard evidence linking the use of cosmetics with cancer.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    According to the American Cancer Society, based on available data, "there is little evidence to suggest that using cosmetics, or being exposed to the ingredients in cosmetics during normal use of these products, increases cancer risk." But certain products may have not been thoroughly tested, so more research is needed.

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Sources | Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on September 30, 2016 Medically Reviewed on September 30, 2016

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on
September 30, 2016

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

1) Jamie Grill

2) Stockbyte

3) iStockphoto

4) Stockbyte

5) Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska / Vetta

6) PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou

7) Andreas Reh / The Agency Collection

8) Polka Dot

9) Hemera

10) iStockphoto

11) Dave Bradley Photography / Stone

12) Garry Gay / Photographer’s Choice

13) Jetta Productions / Iconica

14) SPL / Photo Researchers, Inc.

 

SOURCES:

Office on Women's Health: “Cosmetics and Your Health.”

FDA: "Organic’ Cosmetics.”

Office on Women's Health: “Cosmetics and Your Health.”

National Institutes of Health: “Incidence of Fungi in Shared-Use Cosmetics Available to the Public.”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Keep Your Eyes Beautiful with Safe Makeup Tips.”

FDA: “Kohl, Kajal, Al-Kahal, or Surma: By Any Name, a Source of Lead Poisoning.”

FDA: “Lipstick and Lead: Questions and Answers.”

FDA: “FDA Recall Policy for Cosmetics.”

FDA: “Is It a Cosmetic, a Drug, or Both? (Or Is It Soap?)”

FDA: “Cosmeceutical.”

American Cancer Society: “Cosmetics.”

American Academy of Dermatology: “Skin Cancer Prevention Tips.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.