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Getting Someone to Seek Help for Bipolar Disorder

Very often in bipolar disorder, people with hypomania may not realize it's a problem. They may even enjoy it, finding it to be a productive time. Others struggle with depression, not getting the help that could relieve their suffering.

Yet for various reasons, they don't get help from a doctor. They shrug off a friend or family member's concern. Others view their illness as a distraction or a weakness, and they don't want to give in to it. Still others put their health at a very low priority compared with other things in their lives.

Recommended Related to Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar Disorder Resources

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance web site provides timely information on depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder, and explains how doctors screen for these conditions. This web site provides information for the newly diagnosed, as well as recovery steps, and ways to help a loved one with depression and bipolar disorder. Child & Adolescent Bipolar Foundation The Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation (CABF)...

Read the Bipolar Disorder Resources article > >

However, fear is often the reason for not seeing a doctor. That's especially true if there is a family history of emotional problems. People in denial are protected from their worst fears. They can stay comfortably in their everyday routines -- even though relationships and careers can be at stake.

If you're concerned about a loved one who could have bipolar disorder, talk to him or her about seeing a doctor. Sometimes, simply suggesting a health checkup is the best approach. With other people, it's best to be direct about your concern regarding a mood disorder. Include these points in the discussion:

  • It's not your fault. You have not caused this disorder. Genetics and stressful life events put people at greater vulnerability for bipolar disorder.
  • Millions of Americans have bipolar disorder. It can develop at any point in a person's life -- though it usually develops in young adulthood -- and is responsible for enormous suffering.
  • Bipolar disorder is a real disease. Just like heart disease or diabetes, it requires medical treatment.
  • There's a medical explanation for bipolar disorder. Disruptions in brain chemistry and nerve cell pathways are involved. The brain circuits -- those that control emotion -- are not working the way they should. Because of this, people experience certain moods more intensely, for longer periods of time, and more frequently.
  • Good treatments are available. These treatments have been tested and found to be effective for many, many people with bipolar disorder. Medications can help stabilize your moods. Through therapy, you can discuss feelings, thoughts, and behaviors that cause problems in your social and work life. You can learn how to master these so you can function better and live a more satisfying life.
  • By not getting treatment, you risk having worse mood swings -- and even becoming suicidal. You risk damaging your relationships with friends and family. You could put your job at risk. And your long-term physical health can also be affected, since emotional disturbances affect other systems in the body. This is very serious.

Trust is crucial in shaking someone's denial, in motivating him or her to get help. Trust is also important once treatment for bipolar disorder starts. Through the eyes of a trustworthy friend or family member, a person with bipolar disorder can know when treatment is working -- when things are getting better, and when they're not. If your interest is sincere, you can be of great help to your friend or family member.

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg, MD on June 28, 2012

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