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Bipolar Disorder Health Center

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Treatments for Bipolar Disorder

The most effective treatment for bipolar disorder is a combination of medication and psychotherapy. Most people take more than one drug, like a mood-stabilizing drug and an antipsychotic, benzodiazepine, or antidepressant. However, it's important that treatment be ongoing -- even after you feel better -- to keep mood symptoms under control.

One note of caution: The FDA has determined that antidepressant medications can increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children and adolescents with depression and other mental health disorders. If you have questions or concerns, discuss them with your health care provider.

Recommended Related to Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar Disorder Resources

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance web site provides timely information on depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder, and explains how doctors screen for these conditions. This web site provides information for the newly diagnosed, as well as recovery steps, and ways to help a loved one with depression and bipolar disorder. Child & Adolescent Bipolar Foundation The Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation (CABF)...

Read the Bipolar Disorder Resources article > >

After remission from an acute episode of bipolar disorder, a person is at an especially high risk for relapse for about six months. Thus, continuation and of maintenance ongoing therapy is often recommended.

Anyone who has experienced two to three episodes of bipolar disorder is considered a long-term -- if not lifetime -- patient with bipolar disorder. That person should have maintenance therapy. Once your doctor has helped stabilize the moods of the acute phase of the disorder (either a manic or depressive episode), drug therapy is continued indefinitely -- sometimes at lower doses.

Remember this: Even if you have been without bipolar symptoms for several months, do not stop taking your medications. Your doctor may lower your doses, but discontinuation of medications will put you at risk for recurrence of bipolar symptoms.

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg, MD on June 29, 2012

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