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Autism - Symptoms

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Symptoms during teen years

During the teen years, the patterns of behavior often change. Many teens gain skills but still lag behind in their ability to relate to and understand others. Puberty and emerging sexuality may be more difficult for teens who have autism than for others this age. Teens are at an increased risk for developing problems related to depression, anxiety, and epilepsy.

Symptoms in adulthood

Some adults with autism are able to work and live on their own. The degree to which an adult with autism can lead an independent life is related to intelligence and ability to communicate. At least 33% are able to achieve at least partial independence.2

Some adults with autism need a lot of assistance, especially those with low intelligence who are unable to speak. Part- or full-time supervision can be provided by residential treatment programs. At the other end of the spectrum, adults with high-functioning autism are often successful in their professions and able to live independently, although they typically continue to have some difficulties relating to other people. These individuals usually have average to above-average intelligence.

Other symptoms

Many people with autism have symptoms similar to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But these symptoms, especially problems with social relationships, are more severe for people with autism.

About 10% of people with autism have some form of savant skills—special limited gifts such as memorizing lists, calculating calendar dates, drawing, or musical ability.1

Many people with autism have unusual sensory perceptions. For example, they may describe a light touch as painful and deep pressure as providing a calming feeling. Others may not feel pain at all. Some people with autism have strong food likes and dislikes and unusual preoccupations.

Sleep problems occur in about 40% to 70% of people with autism.3

Almost half of the children who have autism spectrum disorders tend to "wander off" from a caregiver, or "elope." For many caregivers of these children, elopement is one of the most stressful behaviors they must learn to cope with. Studies show that behavioral assessment interventions, such as applied behavioral analysis, may reduce the number of times a child wanders off.4

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