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    Autism Spectrum Disorders Health Center

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    History of Autism

    How Is Autism Treated?

    Treatments for autism vary depending on the needs of the individual. In general, treatments fall into four categories:

    • Behavioral and communication therapy
    • Medical and dietary therapy
    • Occupational and physical therapy
    • Complementary therapy (music or art therapy, for example)

     

    What Are Behavioral and Communication Therapies for Autism?

    The primary treatment for autism includes programs that address several key areas. Those areas are behavior, communication, sensory integration, and social skill development. Addressing these areas requires close coordination between parents, teachers, special education professionals, and mental health professionals.

    How Do Medical and Dietary Therapies Treat Autism?

    The goal of medication is to make it easier for the person with autism to participate in activities such as learning and behavioral therapy. Drugs used to treat anxiety, attention problems, depression, hyperactivity, and impulsivity may be recommended. These do not “cure" autism ( there are no cures yet), but they can treat underlying dysfunctional symptoms that get in the individual’s way of learning and growing.

    There is some evidence that people with autism may have certain deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. These deficiencies don’t cause autism spectrum disorder. Supplements, though, may be recommended to improve nutrition. Vitamin B and magnesium are two of the most frequent supplements used for people with autism. However, one can overdose on these vitamins, so mega-vitamins should be avoided.

    Diet changes may also help with some symptoms of autism. Food allergies, for example, may make behavior problems worse. Removing the allergen from the diet may improve behavior issues.

     

    How Are Complementary Therapies Used to Treat Autism?

    These treatments may help increase learning and communications skills in some people with autism. Complementary therapies include music, art, or animal therapy, such as horseback riding or swimming with dolphins.

    Future Research and Treatment of Autism

    Researchers, health professionals, parents, and persons with autism all have strong opinions about the direction future autism research should take. Everyone would like to find a cure for autism. However, many feel that finding a cure is unlikely. Instead, scarce resources should be devoted toward helping people with autism find better ways to live with the condition.

    No matter what the view toward the future, many techniques and treatments exist now that can help relieve the pain and suffering of autism. These treatments offer many options for improving quality of life of people with autism.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari, MD on May 31, 2016
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