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Autism Spectrum Disorders Health Center

Newborn's Placenta May Predict Autism Risk

Identifying infants with higher odds could improve treatment, researchers say
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Kathleen Doheny

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Autism risk may be spotted at birth by examining placentas for abnormalities, new research suggests.

"We can look at the placenta at birth and determine the chance of being at risk for autism with extremely high reliability," said Dr. Harvey Kliman, a research scientist at Yale University.

One of 88 U.S. children has an autism spectrum disorder, the umbrella name for complex brain development disorders marked by problems with social interaction and communication, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The earlier autism is treated, the better the outcome. But children typically aren't diagnosed until behavioral symptoms begin, perhaps at age 2 or 3 years, or even later. Kliman said the children identified as at risk at birth might benefit from early treatment.

For the new study, published online April 25 in the journal Biological Psychiatry, Kliman and his team examined 117 placentas from newborns whose mothers already had one or more children with some form of autism, which put the infant at higher risk for the disorder. The researchers compared those samples with placenta samples from 100 women who already had one or more typically developing children.

During pregnancy, the placenta keeps the unborn baby's blood supply separate from the mother's while providing the baby with oxygen and nutrients. At delivery, the placenta, also called the afterbirth, follows the baby out of the womb.

The placentas from women whose older children had autism were markedly different from the others, Kliman's team found. They zeroed in on abnormal folds and abnormal cell growth in the placenta, known as trophoblast inclusions.

The placentas from the at-risk pregnancies were eight times more likely to have two or more of these abnormal folds than samples from not-at-risk deliveries. Placentas with four or more of the inclusions predicted an infant with at least a 74 percent probability of being at risk for autism, the researchers said.

"There were no [placentas from pregnancies not at risk] that had more than two of the folds," Kliman said.

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