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Brain & Nervous System Health Center

Brain Aneurysm Directory

A brain aneurysm, also called cerebral aneurysm, is a bulging, weak area in the wall of an artery that supplies blood to the brain. Most brain aneurysms cause no symptoms and are discovered during tests for another, usually unrelated, condition. When symptoms are present, they may include severe headaches, blurred vision, changes in speech, and neck pain, depending on the areas of the brain that are affected and the severity of the aneurysm. In rare cases, a cerebral aneurysm can rupture, releasing blood into the skull. If this happens, you may have a stroke or die, so even mild symptoms should be evaluated by a doctor. Follow the links below to find WebMD's comprehensive coverage about what causes cerebral aneurysm, what it looks like, how to treat it, and much more.

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