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    Blood Test Might Help Spot, Monitor Concussions

    Study found levels of a protein linked with brain damage spiked right after injury, dropped with recovery

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Steven Reinberg

    HealthDay Reporter

    THURSDAY, March 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When someone suffers a concussion, it can be hard to tell how serious it is and how long recovery will take, but a new blood test might help answer those questions.

    Swedish researchers report they have found a way to test blood for a protein called total tau (T-tau), which is released when the brain is injured. The amount of T-tau is apparently key to diagnosing a concussion and predicting when players can get back into the game.

    "We have a biomarker [indicator] that is elevated in the blood of players with a concussion," said lead researcher Dr. Pashtun Shahim, from the department of neurochemistry at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Molndal. "The level of T-tau within the first hour after concussion correlates with the number of days you have symptoms. We can use this biomarker to both diagnose concussion and to monitor the course of concussion until the patient is free of symptoms."

    Shahim added that by watching the level of T-tau drop over time, it is possible to predict when symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, trouble concentrating, memory problems and headaches will disappear.

    This initial trial involved only 28 hockey players, so the findings need to be reproduced in larger trials, the researchers pointed out, and Shahim suspects it will be a couple of years before this test would find its way into clinical practice.

    The report was published online March 13 in the journal JAMA Neurology.

    Dr. Robert Glatter, director of sports medicine and traumatic brain injury in the department of emergency medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said the finding is important.

    "Identifying a reliable marker that correlates with the severity of brain injury, as well as the recovery, can help track progress and improvements after a concussion, and this can provide an objective measure for safe return to play," Glatter said.

    "This is a very promising study that opens the door to looking at biomarkers that can help us to provide better care to athletes with concussions," he added.

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