Skip to content

    Brain & Nervous System Health Center

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Do the Seasons Affect How We Think?

    Small European study finds evidence of seasonal changes in memory, attention

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Randy Dotinga

    HealthDay Reporter

    MONDAY, Feb. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When do you think more clearly: winter or summer? What time of year is your short-term memory at its best?

    A small new study suggests your brainpower may be stronger at certain times of year. The research isn't definitive, and the apparent differences don't seem to be noticeable beyond brain scans. But study co-author Gilles Vandewalle, a research associate with the University of Liege in Belgium, said the study of 28 young adults shows that "season matters."

    And it may matter more to some people than others. In particular, Vandewalle said, people with seasonal affective disorder -- depression during certain months -- may be even more vulnerable to the effects of season on the brain.

    It has long been known that seasons are crucial in other ways. "Seasons are important in animals in terms of reproduction and hibernation," Vandewalle said. And, in humans, "mood is well known to be impacted by seasons."

    An estimated 5 percent of people in the United States suffer from seasonal affective disorder, which triggers depression-type symptoms, typically during the fall and winter. Light therapy is commonly used to treat it, a sign that the condition may be linked to the seasonal differences in sunlight.

    Seasons also affect hormones, the immune system and neurotransmitters, which are chemicals in the brain, Vandewalle pointed out. Some research has suggested that seasons affect thinking abilities, but the findings haven't been conclusive, he said.

    In the new research, Vandewalle and colleagues studied 14 men and 14 women, average age 21, at different times of year between May 2010 and October 2011. The participants spent 4.5 days in laboratories where they had no indication of the season outside, such as daylight, and no access to the outside world.

    Researchers then used brain scans to study how participants handled tasks testing their abilities to pay attention and remember things on a short-term basis.

    The scans suggested that participants' attention skills were best near the summer solstice in June and worst near the winter solstice in December. Their short-term memory was best in fall and worst in spring.

    Today on WebMD

    nerve damage
    Learn how this disease affects the nervous system.
    senior woman with lost expression
    Know the early warning signs.
     
    woman in art gallery
    Tips to stay smart, sharp, and focused.
    medical marijuana plant
    What is it used for?
     
    woman embracing dog
    Quiz
    boy hits soccer ball with head
    Slideshow
     
    red and white swirl
    Article
    marijuana plant
    ARTICLE
     
    brain illustration stroke
    Slideshow
    nerve damage
    Slideshow
     
    Alzheimers Overview
    Slideshow
    Graphic of number filled head and dna double helix
    Quiz