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    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Self-Care for Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    An individual with normal pressure hydrocephalus should always be under the care of a medical professional. Much of the day-to-day care, however, is handled by family and caregivers. Medical care should focus on optimizing the individual's health, safety, and quality of life while helping family members cope with the many challenges of caring for a loved one with dementia and other symptoms of NPH.

    The degree of care required by people with NPH varies considerably. Those who undergo successful shunt surgery may continue to live a normal or near-normal independent life. Others will experience worsening of their symptoms over time. Many of these individuals will eventually require close supervision and care. Your neurologist or neurosurgeon should discuss with you and your family what to expect as time goes on.

    It's important to know that no drug or other medical treatment is known to work in NPH.

    Surgery for Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus is not caused by any structural abnormality, such as a brain tumor. In most cases, the underlying problem is not known or cannot be treated. The treatment in these cases is a shunt operation.

    A shunt is a thin tube that is implanted in the brain by a neurosurgeon. It is inserted into the ventricles to drain excess CSF away from the brain. The tube is routed under the skin from the head to another part of the body, usually the peritoneum (the lower belly). The shunt is equipped with a valve that opens to release fluid when the pressure builds up. The fluid drains harmlessly and is later absorbed by the bloodstream. The pressure setting on the valve sometimes must be readjusted. The newer shunts allow adjustment without another operation.

    A shunt operation is not a cure. It does not treat the underlying cause of NPH. It can, however, relieve the symptoms. The shunt remains in place indefinitely. If properly implanted, the shunt often is not obvious to other people.

    Shunt operations do not work for everyone with NPH. Many people who undergo a shunt operation have substantial symptom relief. In some, the symptoms improve and then start to worsen again. Others benefit little, if at all. Even the experts are not able to predict perfectly who will benefit and who will not. Many surgeons perform a spinal tap before surgery to test whether the symptoms get better with removal of fluid. In some cases, the person is hospitalized for a few days while fluid is drained slowly through a small tube called a catheter. This is another way of checking whether removing extra fluid will help symptoms.

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