Skip to content

Restless Legs Syndrome Center

Diagnosing Restless Legs Syndrome

Font Size
A
A
A

If you are experiencing symptoms of restless legs syndrome, or RLS, consult your doctor. Before making a diagnosis, your doctor will ask you questions about your family health history (for example, if you have any family members with RLS) and will take note of symptoms like sleepiness or insomnia.

 

Recommended Related to Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS)

Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS): Know Your Triggers

Restless legs syndrome, or RLS, is a common nerve condition where you have unpleasant creeping, tugging, or pulling feelings in your legs. You might also have an overwhelming urge to move your legs. The symptoms are usually worse at night or when you're resting. Doctors don't know the cause of RLS, and there’s no cure. But certain things can trigger symptoms. Knowing your triggers and how to avoid them will help. Possible triggers include: Medication -- Your prescription or non-prescription...

Read the Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS): Know Your Triggers article > >

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Varnada Karriem-Norwood, MD on February 23, 2013

Today on WebMD

woman asleep foot hanging out
Is it nervous or sleep disorder?
woman knitting
Warm baths, exercise, and nixing caffeine will help.
 
woman stretching leg
We’ve got four ideas to try and four to avoid.
patient and doctor
If you think you may have RLS, see a doctor for an exam.
 
woman asleep foot hanging out
ARTICLE
pharmacist with a client
ARTICLE
 
woman walking her dog
ARTICLE
patient and doctor
ARTICLE