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Diagnosing Restless Legs Syndrome

If you are experiencing symptoms of restless legs syndrome, or RLS, consult your doctor. Before making a diagnosis, your doctor will ask you questions about your family health history (for example, if you have any family members with RLS) and will take note of symptoms like sleepiness or insomnia.

 

Recommended Related to Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS)

Restless Legs Syndrome and Sleep

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) steals sleep. It's usually worst in the evening and overnight, which can mean little rest, and fatigue the next day. "Most people with RLS have fragmented sleep, with difficulty falling asleep and repetitive jerking motions that can wake them up," says neurologist Nancy Foldvary-Schaefer, DO, director of the Cleveland Clinic's Sleep Disorders Center. The good news, she says, is that many people with RLS respond to simple treatments -- and that can mean better sleep...

Read the Restless Legs Syndrome and Sleep article > >

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Richard Senelick, MD on February 07, 2015

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