Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Brain & Nervous System Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Understanding Meningitis -- the Basics

What Is Meningitis?

Meningitis is a relatively rare infection that affects the delicate membranes -- called meninges (men-in'-jeez) -- that cover the brain and spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis can be contagious among people in close contact.

Viral meningitis tends to be less severe, and most people recover completely. 

Fungal meningitis is a rare form of meningitis and generally occurs only in people with weakened immune systems.

meningitis

 

What Causes Meningitis?

Meningitis is almost always caused by a bacterial or viral infection that began elsewhere in the body, such as in the ears, sinuses, or upper respiratory tract. Less common causes of meningitis include fungal infection, autoimmune disorders, and medications.

Bacterial Meningitis

Bacterial meningitis is an extremely serious illness that requires immediate medical care. If not treated quickly, it can lead to death within hours -- or lead to permanent damage to the brain and other parts of the body.

Bacterial meningitis is caused by any one of several bacteria. Neisseria meningitidis or "meningococcus" is common in children and young adults, and Streptococcuspneumoniae or "pneumococcus" is another common cause in children and adults. Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was a common cause of meningitis in infants and young children until the Hib vaccine was introduced for infants. Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae account for most of the bacterial meningitis cases in the U.S. Vaccines are available for both Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. They're recommended for all children and adults at special risk. 

The bacteria can spread from person to person through coughing and sneezing. If you are around someone who has bacterial meningitis, contact your health care provider to ask what steps you need to take to avoid infection.

In many instances, bacterial meningitis develops when bacteria get into the bloodstream from the sinuses, ears, or other part of the upper respiratory tract. The bacteria then travel through the bloodstream to the brain.

Viral Meningitis

Viral meningitis is more common than the bacterial form and generally -- but not always -- less serious. It can be triggered by a number of viruses, including several that can cause diarrhea.

People with viral meningitis are much less likely to have permanent brain damage after the infection resolves. Most will recover completely.

Fungal Meningitis

Fungal meningitis is much less common than the other two infectious forms. Fungus-related meningitis is rare in healthy people. However, someone who has an impaired immune system such as a person with AIDS is more likely to become infected with this form of meningitis.

Who Is Most at Risk for Meningitis?

Anyone can develop just about any kind of meningitis. But research has shown that some age groups have higher rates of meningitis than others. They are:

  • Children under age 5
  • Teenagers and young adults age 16-25
  • Adults over age 55

Studies have shown that meningitis is more of a danger for people with certain medical conditions, such as a damaged or missing spleen, chronic disease, or immune system disorders. 

Because certain germs that cause meningitis can be contagious, outbreaks are most likely to occur in places where people are living in close quarters. So college students in dorms or army recruits in barracks are at higher risk. So are people traveling to areas where meningitis is more common, such as parts of Africa.

However, keep this in mind. Even if your personal odds of getting meningitis are higher than average, it's still a rare disease and there are steps you can take to minimize your risk of getting meningitis.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Varnada Karriem-Norwood, MD on March 17, 2014

Today on WebMD

Depressed
Slideshow
3d scan of fractured skull
Slideshow
 
human brain waves
Article
brain maze
fitQuiz
 
senior man
Article
brain research briefing
Article
 
Syringe
Article
graphic of human head
Article
 
mans hands on laptop keyboard
Article
brain illustration stroke
Slideshow
 
most common stroke symptoms
Article
Parkinsons Disease Medications
Article