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Understanding Temporal Lobe Seizure

What Are the Symptoms of Temporal Lobe Seizure?

A seizure originating in the temporal lobe of the brain may be preceded by an aura or warning symptom, such as:

  • Abnormal sensations (which may include a rising or "funny" feeling in the gut)
  • Hallucinations (including sights, smells, tastes)
  • Vivid deja vu or recalled memories or emotions
  • A sudden, intense emotion not related to anything happening at the time

During the seizure, a person may experience motor disturbances, sensory symptoms, or autonomic symptoms.

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Motor or movement disturbances (called automatisms) may include the following:

  • Rhythmic muscle contractions on one side of the body or face
  • Abnormal mouth behaviors (lip smacking, chewing for no reason, slobbering)
  • Abnormal head movements (forced turning of the head or eyes)
  • Repetitive movements (such as picking at clothing)

Other sensory symptoms may include the following sensations that start in one area and spread:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • A feeling that the flesh is crawling

Autonomic symptoms may include the following:

  • Abdominal pain or nausea
  • Sweating, flushing, dilated pupils, or rapid heartbeat

Depending on whether the victim remains conscious, he or she may not remember having a seizure at all. A period of confusion frequently follows seizures and can last several minutes.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on April 26, 2013

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