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    Breast Cancer: Answers to Your Questions

    How do you tell the kids? How can you stay calm? There are some questions your doctor can't answer. Here are insights from people who understand – other women with breast cancer.
    By
    WebMD Feature
    Reviewed by Cynthia Dennison Haines, MD

    Am I going to make it?

    We all ask this question, even if only in our minds. The difficult truth, of course, is that no one can give you a guarantee -- not your surgeon, not your oncologist. But you have far better odds than you may think. Most women with breast cancer in the U.S. survive more than five years, the yardstick used by most doctors.

    Our suggestion?

    Recommended Related to Breast Cancer

    Breast Cancer: Resources

    The American Cancer Society has information on breast cancer and most other types of cancer. This link will take you to the organization’s web site. American Cancer Society

    Read the Breast Cancer: Resources article > >

    Do a lot of research! Go on the Internet or to the local library. Take notes! You'll feel more in control if you're informed. And it'll help you ask the right questions to get the answers you need from your doctors. Some doctors may not offer to show you your pathology report showing the type of cancer you have and possibly information on how far it has spread. Ask for it! Some doctors may not offer you all the treatment choices. Others may lay out every possible choice, then say the decision is up to you. Either way, you'll feel more confident if you've done your own research.

    Also, talk to other survivors. Go on the Internet and visit message boards for breast cancer survivors. Just post the question: Anyone out there who was diagnosed 10 or even 20 years ago? You'll be amazed by all the women who answer you. They can offer you the hope and courage you need now.

    How am I going to look after treatment?

    The answer depends on what you do.

    If you have a mastectomy that is covered by your health insurance, your insurance is required to cover full reconstructive surgery as well. You can even have the plastic surgeon waiting to walk into the operating room the moment your breast surgeon walks out. But you'll have to ask for this; don't expect your doctor or insurer to suggest it! Plastic surgeons can rebuild real looking breasts with implants or with tissue from your own body (like fat and muscle). They can even rebuild the nipple.

    If you have a lumpectomy, you may have a small dimple in your breast -- or a large divot -- it all depends on how much tissue the surgeon removes.

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