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    Becoming a Proactive Cancer Patient

    Experts explain what newly diagnosed cancer patients need to know to help fight their disease.
    (continued)

    Know Your Information 'Comfort Level'

    While some patients go into overdrive learning all they can almost immediately, others either don't feel comfortable doing this or don't want to know too many specifics.

    Internet-savvy family members or friends can be called on when patients can't do their own research.

    M.D. Anderson gynecological cancer specialist Charles Levenback, MD, tells WebMD that it is important that patients think about just how much information they want before they sit down with their doctors.

    "These days the assumption is that the patient wants to know everything, but some may really only want the big picture," he says. "Or they want more information as time goes on. It is important to communicate this."

    It is also a good idea to write down questions before meeting with your doctor. The American Cancer Society web site includes a long list of potential questions which can be found in the "Learn about Cancer" section of the site, under the main heading "Patients, Family and Friends." Sample questions, which can be printed and taken along on doctors visits, can also be found on WebMD.

    Another Set of Ears

    Patients often benefit when they bring someone along to appointments for support and to act as another set of ears, Levenback says. A friend is often better than a close family member in this support role, because family members are often as upset as the patient.

    Christina Koenig of Y-ME recommends bringing a tape recorder to doctor's appointments if all agree that this is appropriate.

    At the very least, someone should take notes during appointments, Arnim says.

    "I've had people tell me that after the first five minutes they didn't hear a thing their doctor was telling them," she says. "That is to be expected"

    Don't Be Afraid to Rock the Boat

    Arnim says cancer patients are often reluctant to speak up when they are upset about something, out of a conscious or subconscious fear that their doctors or other medical caregivers will abandon them.

    "The tendency when someone is feeling vulnerable and scared is to put up with something rather than rock the boat," she says. "But even though your instincts may be telling you to keep quiet, it is important to speak up."

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