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Breast Cancer Health Center

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Breast Cancer Survivors: Life After the Treatments End

The breast cancer treatments are over. Now what? Here's how to return to your "new normal."
WebMD Feature

Life after breast cancer means returning to some familiar things and also making some new choices.

The song says "It ain't over 'til it's over," but when you've had breast cancer, you discover that it's not even over when it's over.

Recommended Related to Breast Cancer

General Information About Male Breast Cancer

Incidence and Mortality Estimated new cases and deaths from breast cancer (men only) in the United States in 2014:[1] New cases: 2,360. Deaths: 430. Male breast cancer is rare.[2] Less than 1% of all breastcarcinomas occur in men.[3,4] The mean age at diagnosis is between 60 and 70 years, though men of all ages can be affected with the disease. Risk Factors Predisposing risk factors [5] appear to include radiation exposure, estrogen administration, and diseases associated...

Read the General Information About Male Breast Cancer article > >

After a marathon of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment that may last six months to a year, you can hardly wait to get back to a normal life again. But the day of your last radiation treatment or chemotherapy infusion doesn't mark the end of your journey with breast cancer.

Instead, you're about to embark on another leg of the trip. This one is all about adjusting to life as a breast cancer survivor. In many ways, it will be a lot like the life you had before, but in other ways, it will be very different. Call it your "new normal."

From your relationships with your family and your spouse to eating habits and exercise, breastcancer will change your life in ways that last well after treatment ends. How do you fight lingering fatigue? What should you eat to help prevent a breastcancer recurrence? Will you ever have a regular sex life again? These are just a few of the questions that may nag at you as you make the transition from breast cancer treatment to breast cancer survival.

"Chemobrain" and Other After-Effects

You watched the last dose of chemotherapy drip from the IV into your veins six months ago. Your hair has really started to grow back. Maybe it's curly where it once was straight, or a lot grayer than before, but it's hair. You have eyebrows again. So why are you still so tired? When are you going to feel like you again?

"Your body has just been through an enormous assault, and recovery is a huge thing. You're not going to just bounce back right away," says oncologist Marisa Weiss, MD, founder of and the author of Living Beyond Breast Cancer. "You've been hit while you're down so many times: with surgery and anesthesia, perhaps with multiple cycles of chemotherapy, perhaps with radiation."

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