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    Breast Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Breast Cancer

    1. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Treatment Options by Stage

      Stage I, Stage II, Stage IIIA, and Operable Stage IIIC Breast CancerTreatment of stage I, stage II, stage IIIA, and operable stage IIIC breast cancer may include the following:Breast-conserving surgery to remove only the cancer and some surrounding breast tissue, followed by lymph node dissection and radiation therapy.Modified radical mastectomy with or without breast reconstruction surgery.Sentinel lymph node biopsy followed by surgery.Adjuvant therapy (treatment given after surgery to lower the risk that cancer will come back) may include the following: Radiation therapy to the lymph nodes near the breast and to the chest wall after a modified radical mastectomy.Chemotherapy with or without hormone therapy.Hormone therapy.Monoclonal antibody therapy with trastuzumab combined with chemotherapy.A clinical trial of new targeted therapies.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I breast cancer, stage II breast

    2. Breast Cancer Screening - Inflammatory Breast Cancer

      In inflammatory breast cancer, cancer has spread to the skin of the breast and the breast looks red and swollen and feels warm. The redness and warmth occur because the cancer cells block the lymph vessels in the skin. The skin of the breast may also show the dimpled appearance called peau d'orange (like the skin of an orange). There may not be any lumps in the breast that can be felt. Inflammatory breast cancer may be stage IIIB, stage IIIC, or stage IV.Inflammatory breast cancer of the left breast showing peau d'orange and inverted nipple.

    3. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - What is screening?

      Screening is looking for cancer before a person has any symptoms. This can help find cancer at an early stage. When abnormal tissue or cancer is found early,it may be easier to treat. By the time symptoms appear,cancer may have begun to spread. Scientists are trying to better understand which people are more likely to get certain types of cancer. They also study the things we do and the ...

    4. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Recurrent Breast Cancer

      Recurrent breast cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the breast, in the chest wall, or in other parts of the body.

    5. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - To Learn More About Breast Cancer

      For more information from the National Cancer Institute about breast cancer, see the following: Breast Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Breast CancerSurgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast CancerPreventive MastectomyBreast Reconstruction After MastectomyAdjuvant and Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast CancerSentinel Lymph Node BiopsyDrugs Approved for Breast CancerHormone Therapy for Breast CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies and Targeted Therapies for Breast Cancer)Targeted Cancer TherapiesInflammatory Breast CancerBRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic TestingGenetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer SyndromesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with

    6. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - About This PDQ Summary

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

    7. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Mammography—Variables Associated with Accuracy

      Patient CharacteristicsSeveral characteristics of women being screened that are associated with the accuracy of mammography include age, breast density, whether it is the first or subsequent exam, and time since last mammogram. Younger women have lower sensitivity and higher false-positive rates on screening mammography than do older women (refer to the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium performance measures by age for more information).For women of all ages, high breast density is associated with 10% to 29% lower sensitivity.[1] High breast density is an inherent trait, which can be familial [2,3] but also may be affected by age, endogenous [4] and exogenous [5,6] hormones,[7] selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen,[8] and diet.[9] Hormone therapy is associated with increased breast density and is associated not only with lower sensitivity but also with an increased rate of interval cancers.[10]The Million Women Study in the United Kingdom revealed

    8. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

      Breast cancer in men is treated the same as breast cancer in women. (See the PDQ summary on Breast Cancer Treatment for more information.)Initial SurgeryTreatment for men diagnosed with breast cancer is usually modified radical mastectomy. Breast-conserving surgery with lumpectomy may be used for some men.Adjuvant TherapyTherapy given after an operation when cancer cells can no longer be seen is called adjuvant therapy. Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the operation, the patient may be given radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and/or targeted therapy after surgery, to try to kill any cancer cells that may be left.Node-negative: For men whose cancer is node-negative (cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes), adjuvant therapy should be considered on the same basis as for a woman with breast cancer because there is no evidence that response to therapy is different for men and women.Node-positive: For men whose cancer is

    9. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Treatment Options for Locally Recurrent Male Breast Cancer

      For men with locally recurrent disease (cancer that has come back in a limited area after treatment), treatment is usually either:Surgery combined with chemotherapy; orRadiation therapy combined with chemotherapy.

    10. Breast Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Get More Information From NCI

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

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