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Breast Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Breast Cancer

  1. Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - High-Penetrance Breast and / or Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    BRCA1andBRCA2IntroductionEpidemiologic studies have clearly established the role of family history as an important risk factor for both breast and ovarian cancer. After gender and age, a positive family history is the strongest known predictive risk factor for breast cancer. However, it has long been recognized that in some families, there is hereditary breast cancer, which is characterized by an early age of onset, bilaterality, and the presence of breast cancer in multiple generations in an apparent autosomal dominant pattern of transmission (through either the maternal or paternal lineage), sometimes including tumors of other

  2. Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Male Breast Cancer

    Incidence and Mortality Estimated new cases and deaths from breast cancer (men only) in the United States in 2011:[ 1 ] New cases: 2,140. Deaths: 450. Male breast cancer is rare.[ 2 ] Less than 1% of all breast carcinomas occur in men.[ 3,4 ] The mean age at diagnosis is between 60 and 70 years,though men of all ages can be affected with the disease. Predisposing risk factors [ 5 ] appear ...

  3. Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Breast Cancer

    After breast cancer has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the breast or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out whether the cancer has spread within the breast or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:Sentinel lymph node biopsy: The removal of the sentinel lymph node during surgery. The sentinel lymph node is the first lymph node to receive lymphatic drainage from a tumor. It is the first lymph node the cancer is likely to spread to from the tumor. A radioactive substance and/or blue dye is injected near the tumor. The substance or dye flows through the lymph ducts to the lymph nodes. The first lymph node to receive the substance or dye is removed. A pathologist views the tissue under a microscope to

  4. Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    Screening tests have risks.Decisions about screening tests can be difficult. Not all screening tests are helpful and most have risks. Before having any screening test, you may want to discuss the test with your doctor. It is important to know the risks of the test and whether it has been proven to reduce the risk of dying from cancer.The risks of breast cancer screening tests include the following: Finding breast cancer may not improve health or help a woman live longer. Screening may not help you if you have fast-growing breast cancer or if it has already spread to other places in your body. Also, some breast cancers found on a screening mammogram may never cause symptoms or become life-threatening. When such cancers are found, treatment would not help you live longer and may instead cause serious side effects. At this time, it is not possible to be sure which breast cancers found by screening will cause problems and which ones will not.False-negative test results can occur.

  5. Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (10 / 24 / 2014)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  6. Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer in men is treated the same as breast cancer in women. (See the PDQ summary on Breast Cancer Treatment for more information.)Initial SurgeryTreatment for men diagnosed with breast cancer is usually modified radical mastectomy. Breast-conserving surgery with lumpectomy may be used for some men.Adjuvant TherapyTherapy given after an operation when cancer cells can no longer be seen is called adjuvant therapy. Even if the doctor removes all the cancer that can be seen at the time of the operation, the patient may be given radiation therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and/or targeted therapy after surgery, to try to kill any cancer cells that may be left.Node-negative: For men whose cancer is node-negative (cancer has not spread to the lymph nodes), adjuvant therapy should be considered on the same basis as for a woman with breast cancer because there is no evidence that response to therapy is different for men and women.Node-positive: For men whose cancer is

  7. Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Treatment of triple-negative breast cancer may include the following:Chemotherapy followed by surgery (breast-conserving surgery, total mastectomy, or modified radical mastectomy) and lymph node dissection.A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy with drugs that are often used to treat breast cancer and drugs that are not usually used to treat breast cancer.A clinical trial of PARP inhibitor therapy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with triple-negative breast cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

  8. Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the genetics of breast and ovarian cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Cancer Genetics Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus

  9. Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Breast Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about breast cancer, see the following: Breast Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Breast CancerSurgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast CancerPreventive MastectomyBreast Reconstruction After MastectomyAdjuvant and Neoadjuvant Therapy for Breast CancerSentinel Lymph Node BiopsyDrugs Approved for Breast CancerHormone Therapy for Breast CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies and Targeted Therapies for Breast Cancer)Targeted Cancer TherapiesInflammatory Breast CancerBRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic TestingGenetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer SyndromesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with

  10. Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (09 / 02 / 2014)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

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