Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Breast Cancer Health Center

Font Size

Drugs Can Cut Breast Cancer Risk for Some: Experts

Draft guidelines for doctors reflect findings, but it's hard to know who will benefit most, experts say

WebMD News from HealthDay

Small, but steady, increase over past 30 years

By Carina Storrs

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- The drugs tamoxifen and raloxifene (Evista) could reduce the risk of breast cancer among women who are at high risk of developing the disease, a new report confirms.

Along with the report, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force also issued draft recommendations that reflect those findings, which will be published in the April 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The task force recommendations state that doctors should talk about the potential benefits and harms of taking drugs to prevent breast cancer, a strategy known as chemoprevention, with patients who are at high risk of developing breast cancer.

That guideline is consistent with that of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Cancer Society, and reflects current clinical practice, the task force said.

"We had a nice set of well-done, large [studies], so we have a lot of confidence in the results to really inform the recommendations," said report author Dr. Heidi Nelson, a research professor of medical informatics and clinical epidemiology at the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland. Nelson and the other report authors are not task force members and were contracted by the panel to analyze and summarize the latest research for the report.

One of the report's key findings was that studies of tamoxifen reported a decrease in breast cancer incidence from 23.5 per 1,000 women in the placebo group to 16.5 per 1,000 among women taking tamoxifen over a five-year period. Nelson and her colleagues arrived at these numbers by analyzing four studies of women who took tamoxifen for about four years and their rates of breast cancer over the following seven to 13 years.

Another advance since the 2002 recommendations is a 2010 study that compared tamoxifen and raloxifene directly. "Tamoxifen is more effective at reducing breast cancer risk, but it has more side effects," Nelson said. In this study, there were five fewer cancers per 1,000 women taking tamoxifen when compared with raloxifene.

For both drugs, the benefits have to be weighed against the potential harms, Nelson said. "The tricky part is finding the right candidate" who is at increased risk of breast cancer and has a low risk of experiencing adverse events from the medications, she added.

The report looked at the rates of adverse events such as blood clots, which was about 90 percent more likely in studies of women taking tamoxifen and 60 percent more likely among women taking raloxifene. For tamoxifen, 8.6 per 1,000 women experienced a blood clot compared with 4.6 per 1,000 in the "control" group.

The rates of endometrial cancer, or cancer of the uterus, and cataracts were also higher for women taking tamoxifen, but not for those taking raloxifene, compared with their respective control groups.

Today on WebMD

Breast Cancer Overview
From self-exams and biopsies to reconstruction, we’ve got you covered.
Dealing with breast cancer
Get answers to your questions.
 
woman having mammogram
Experts don’t agree on all fronts, but you can be your own advocate.
woman undergoing breast cancer test
Many women worry. But the truth? Most abnormalities aren’t breast cancer.
 
Breast Cancer Treatments Improving
VIDEO
Resolved To Quit Smoking
SLIDESHOW
 
Woman getting mammogram
Article
Screening Tests for Women
SLIDESHOW
 
ovarian cancer overview slideshow
SLIDESHOW
serious woman
Article
 
what is your cancer risk
HEALTH CHECK
10 Ways to Revitalize Slideshow
SLIDESHOW