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Bladder Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Bladder Cancer

  1. Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage 0 Bladder Cancer Treatment

    Standard Treatment Options for Stage 0 Bladder CancerPatients with stage 0 bladder tumors can be cured by a variety of treatments, even though the tendency for new tumor formation is high. In a series of patients with Ta or T1 tumors who were followed for a minimum of 20 years or until death, the risk of bladder cancer recurrence after initial resection was 80%.[1] Of greater concern than recurrence is the risk of progression to muscle-invasive, locally-advanced, or metastatic bladder cancer. While progression is rare for patients with low-grade tumors, it is common among patients with high-grade cancers. One series of 125 patients with TaG3 cancers followed for 15 to 20 years reported that 39% progressed to more advanced-stage disease while 26% died of urothelial cancer. In comparison, among 23 patients with TaG1 tumors, none died and only 5% progressed.[2] Risk factors for recurrence and progression are the following:[2,3,4,5,6]High-grade disease.Presence of

  2. Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Bladder Cancer

    Related Summaries Note: Other PDQ summaries containing information related to bladder cancer include the following: Bladder and Other Urothelial Cancers Screening Unusual Cancers of Childhood Statistics Note: Estimated new cases and deaths from bladder cancer in the United States in 2010:[ 1 ] New cases: 70,530. Deaths: 14,680. Prognosis Approximately 70% to 80% of patients with newly diagnosed ...

  3. Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with bladder cancer. Different types of treatment are available for patients with bladder cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment. Four types of standard treatment are used:Surgery One of the following types of surgery may be done: Transurethral resection (TUR) with fulguration: Surgery in which a cystoscope (a thin lighted tube) is inserted into the bladder through the urethra. A tool with a small wire loop on the end is then used

  4. Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent Bladder Cancer Treatment

    The prognosis for any patient with progressive or recurrent invasive bladder cancer is generally poor. Management of recurrence depends on previous therapy, sites of recurrence, and individual patient considerations. Treatment of new superficial or locally invasive tumors that develop in the setting of previous conservative therapy for superficial bladder neoplasia has been discussed earlier in this summary.Recurrent or progressive disease in distant sites or after definitive local therapy has an extremely poor prognosis, and clinical trials should be considered whenever possible. Patients who have not received previous chemotherapy for urothelial carcinoma should be considered for chemotherapy as described above for stage IV disease. Palliative radiation therapy should be considered for patients with symptomatic tumors.Standard Treatment Options for Recurrent Bladder CancerStandard treatment options for patients with recurrent bladder cancer include the following:Combination

  5. Bladder and Other Urothelial Cancers Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062875-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Bladder and Other Urothelial Cancers Screening

  6. Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent or Metastatic Urethral Cancer

    Local recurrences of urethral cancer may be amenable to local modality therapy with radiation or surgery, with or without chemotherapy. (Refer to the Treatment Option Overview section of this summary for more information.) Metastatic disease may be treated with regimens in common use for other urothelial transitional cell or squamous cell carcinomas, or anal carcinomas, depending upon the histology.[1,2,3]Treatment options:Locally recurrent urethral cancer after radiation therapy should be treated by surgical excision, if feasible.Locally recurrent urethral cancer after surgery alone should be considered for combination radiation and wider surgical resection.Metastatic urethral cancer should be considered for clinical trials using chemotherapy. Transitional cell cancer of the urethra may respond favorably to the same chemotherapy regimens employed for advanced transitional cell cancer of the bladder.[2,3,4,5]The level of evidence for these treatment options is 3iiiDiv.Current Clinical

  7. Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Bladder Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about bladder cancer, see the following:Bladder Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Bladder CancerBladder and Other Urothelial Cancers ScreeningUnusual Cancers of ChildhoodDrugs Approved for Bladder CancerBiological Therapies for CancerSmoking Home Page (Includes help with quitting)For general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  8. Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  9. Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (05 / 10 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  10. Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    Information about the treatment of urethral cancer and the outcomes of therapy is derived from retrospective, single-center case series and represents a very low level of evidence of 3iiiDiv. The majority of this information comes from the small numbers of cases accumulated over many decades at major academic centers. Therefore, the treatment in these reports is usually not standardized and the treatment also spans eras of shifting supportive care practices. Because of the rarity of urethral cancer, its treatment may also reflect extrapolation from the management of other urothelial malignancies, such as bladder cancer in the case of transitional cancers, and anal cancer in the case of squamous cell carcinomas. Role of SurgerySurgery is the mainstay of therapy for urethral cancers in both women and men.[Level of evidence: 3iiiDiv] The surgical approach depends on tumor stage and anatomic location, and tumor grade plays a less important role in treatment decisions.[1,2] Although the

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