Skip to content

    Brain Cancer Health Center

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Home Care for Brain Cancer

    When fighting brain cancer, the health care providers in charge of your case should discuss details about home care with you and your family members.

    • Home care usually includes supportive measures, depending on your symptoms.
    • For example, if you have trouble walking, you probably should have a walker or wheelchair available at home.
    • If you have mental status changes, a care plan should be directed to your individual needs.

    If the prognosis is poor, it is appropriate to discuss options that include hospice care, advance directives to doctors, and provisions for a living will.

    Recommended Related to Brain Cancer

    Jean Smart Takes a Leading Role in Battling Brain Cancer

    Jean Smart is used to changing roles. The blond beauty first made audiences laugh as Charlene Stillfield on CBS's Designing Women sitcom, won two Emmy Awards as Lana Gardner on NBC's Frasier, and took home a third for her role on ABC's comedic hit Samantha Who? in 2007. She also made a splash as the emotionally unstable but smart wife of the president in the fifth season of Fox's TV thriller 24 in 2006. Now, in one of her most important roles yet, the Seattle native has joined forces with the Chris...

    Read the Jean Smart Takes a Leading Role in Battling Brain Cancer article > >

    • Home hospice care is a way of providing pain and symptom relief, as well as emotional and spiritual support for the patient and the family, at home rather than in the hospital. It involves a multidisciplinary approach that may include a doctor or other health care provider, nurses, a pharmacist, aides, a social worker, a spiritual caregiver, and counselors.
    • Advance directives and living wills are legal documents that spell out specifically which treatments are to be given and which are to be withheld. For example, a person with advanced brain cancer may not want to be put on a ventilator (breathing machine) if he or she stops breathing. You have the right to make these decisions for yourself as long as you are mentally competent.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, DO, MS on January 17, 2016
    Next Article:

    Today on WebMD

    doctor and patient
    How to know when it’s time for home care
    doctory with x-ray
    Here are 10 to know.
     
    sauteed cherry tomatoes
    Fight cancer one plate at a time.
    Lung cancer xray
    See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
     
    Malignant Gliomas
    Article
    Pets Improve Your Health
    SLIDESHOW
     
    Headache Emergencies
    Video
    life after a brain tumor
    VIDEO