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Brain Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Brain Cancer

  1. Changes to This Summary (02 / 01 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  2. Pituitary Carcinomas Treatment

    Standard Treatment Options for Pituitary CarcinomasStandard treatment options for pituitary carcinomas include the following:Surgery.Dopamine agonists, such as bromocriptine, pergolide, quinagolide, and cabergoline, for prolactin (PRL)-producing carcinomas.Somatostatin analogues, such as octreotide, for growth hormone (GH)-producing and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-producing carcinomas.Adjuvant radiation therapy, which does not appear to change the disease's outcome.Chemotherapy, which is of little benefit.Some reports indicate that as many as 88% of pituitary carcinomas are endocrinologically active, and adrenocorticotrophin hormone-secreting tumors are the most common.[1] Treatments for patients with pituitary carcinomas are palliative, with the mean survival time ranging from 2 years to 2.4 years, though several case reports of long-term survivors have been published.[2,3,4,5]Treatment options for patients with pituitary carcinomas include resection and dopamine agonists for

  3. About This PDQ Summary

    PURPOSE OF THIS SUMMARY This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive,peer-reviewed,evidence-based information about the treatment of pituitary tumors. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions. REVIEWERS AND UPDATES ...

  4. Changes to This Summary (01 / 23 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Untreated Childhood Brain Stem GliomaAdded Warren et al. as reference 18 and level of evidence 2A.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  5. Stage Information

    The treatment section of this document is organized to correspond with the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) risk-based schema for the treatment of neuroblastoma. This schema is based on 3 factors: patient age at diagnosis,certain biological characteristics of the patient’s neuroblastoma tumor,and the stage of the tumor as defined by the International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS). The .

  6. To Learn More About Childhood Brain Tumors

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about childhood brain tumors,see the following: What You Need to Know About™ Brain Tumors Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) For more childhood cancer information and other general cancer resources from the National Cancer Institute,see the following: What You Need to Know About™ Cancer - An Overview Childhood Cancers CureSearch - ...

  7. Medulloblastoma

    Important It is possible that the main title of the report Medulloblastoma is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report. ...

  8. Treatment of Recurrent Childhood High-Grade Astrocytomas

    Most patients with high-grade astrocytomas or gliomas will eventually have tumor recurrence, usually within 3 years of original diagnosis but perhaps many years after initial treatment. Disease may recur at the primary tumor site, at the margin of the resection/radiation bed, or at noncontiguous central nervous system sites. Systemic relapse is rare but may occur. At the time of recurrence, a complete evaluation for extent of relapse is indicated for all malignant tumors. Biopsy or surgical resection may be necessary for confirmation of relapse because other entities, such as secondary tumor and treatment-related brain necrosis, may be clinically indistinguishable from tumor recurrence. The need for surgical intervention must be individualized on the basis of the initial tumor type, the length of time between initial treatment and the reappearance of the mass lesion, and the clinical picture. Patients for whom initial treatment fails may benefit from additional treatment.[1]

  9. Brain Cancer Symptoms

    Learn about brain cancer symptoms and signs and when to seek medical care.

  10. Home Care for Brain Cancer

    Home care is an important part of brain cancer treatment. Here's help thinking ahead.

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