Skip to content

Cervical Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cervical Cancer

  1. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (07 / 22 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  2. Endometrial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Endometrial Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about endometrial cancer, see the following: Endometrial Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Cancer of the UterusEndometrial Cancer PreventionEndometrial Cancer ScreeningTamoxifen: Questions and AnswersFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  3. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Questions or Comments About This Summary

    If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to Cancer.gov through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

  4. Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062817-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Cervical Cancer Prevention

  5. Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  6. Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Evidence of Harm

    Annually in the United States, an estimated 65 million women undergo cervical cancer screening;[1] about 3.9 million (6%) will be referred for further evaluation.[2] About 11,000 cases of invasive cervical cancer were diagnosed in 2008. Thus, Papanicolaou (Pap) test screening results in a large number of colposcopies for benign conditions.The major potential harm of screening for cervical cancer lies in the screening detection of many cytologic abnormalities such as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), the majority of which would never progress to cervical cancer. Women with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive ASCUS or LSIL on Pap testing are usually referred for colposcopy. Histological CIN 2+ is treated with cryotherapy or loop electrosurgical excision procedure. These procedures permanently alter the cervix and have consequences on fertility and pregnancy.[3] Younger women are more likely to acquire HPV

  7. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (04 / 12 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. This summary was renamed from Gestational Trophoblastic Tumors and Neoplasia Treatment.General Information About Gestational Trophoblastic Disease This section was renamed from General Information About Gestational Trophoblastic Tumors and Neoplasia.Revised text to state that gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a broad term encompassing both benign and malignant growths arising from products of conception in the uterus.Revised text to state that GTD may be classified as: hydatidiform mole (HM) including complete HM and partial HM; gestational trophoblastic neoplasia including Invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, and placental-site trophoblastic tumor; and, epithelioid trophoblastic tumor.Cellular Classification of Gestational Trophoblastic DiseaseThis section was renamed from Cellular

  8. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about endometrial cancer screening. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process

  9. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Hydatidiform Mole (HM) Management

    Treatment of HM is within the purview of the obstetrician/gynecologist and will not be discussed separately here. However, following the diagnosis and treatment of HM, patients should be monitored to rule out the possibility of metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. In almost all cases, this can be performed with routine monitoring of serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) to document its return to normal. An effective form of contraception is important during the follow-up period to avoid the confusion that can occur with a rising beta-hCG as a result of pregnancy. Chemotherapy is necessary when there is the following: A rising beta-hCG titer for 2 weeks (3 titers).A tissue diagnosis of choriocarcinoma.A plateau of the beta-hCG for 3 weeks.Persistence of detectable beta-hCG 6 months after mole evacuation.Metastatic disease.An elevation in beta-hCG after a normal value.Postevacuation hemorrhage not caused by retained tissues.Chemotherapy is ultimately required for

  10. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage 0 Cervical Cancer

    Consensus guidelines have been issued for managing women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or adenocarcinoma in situ.[1] Properly treated, tumor control of in situ cervical carcinoma should be nearly 100%. Either expert colposcopic-directed biopsy or cone biopsy is required to exclude invasive disease before therapy is undertaken. A correlation between cytology and colposcopic-directed biopsy is also necessary before local ablative therapy is done. Even so, unrecognized invasive disease treated with inadequate ablative therapy may be the most common cause of failure.[2] Failure to identify the disease, lack of correlation between the Pap smear and colposcopic findings, adenocarcinoma in situ, or extension of disease into the endocervical canal makes a laser, loop, or cold-knife conization mandatory. The choice of treatment will also depend on several patient factors including age, desire to preserve fertility, and medical condition. Most importantly, the extent of disease must

Displaying 101 - 110 of 161 Articles << Prev Page 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Next >>

Today on WebMD

cancer cell
HPV is the top cause. Find out more.
doctor and patient
Get to know the Symptoms.
 
sauteed cherry tomatoes
Fight cancer one plate at a time.
Lung cancer xray
See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
 
Integrative Medicine Cancer Quiz
QUIZ
Lifestyle Tips for Depression Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
Screening Tests for Women
Slideshow
what is your cancer risk
HEALTH CHECK