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    Cervical Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Cervical Cancer

    1. Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

      Surgery is often the principal means of diagnosis and is the primary treatment for all patients with uterine sarcoma. If the diagnosis is known, the extent of surgery is planned according to the stage of the tumor. Hysterectomy is usually performed when a uterine malignancy is suspected, except for rare instances when preservation of the uterus in a young patient is deemed safe for the type of cancer (e.g., a totally confined low-grade leiomyosarcoma in a woman who desires to retain childbearing potential). Medically suitable patients with the preoperative diagnosis of uterine sarcoma are considered candidates for abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and pelvic and periaortic selective lymphadenectomy. Cytologic washings are obtained from the pelvis and abdomen. Thorough examination of the diaphragm, omentum, and upper abdomen is performed. There is no firm evidence from a prospective study that adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation therapy is of benefit for patients

    2. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Low-Risk Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia (FIGO Score 0–6) Treatment

      There is no consensus on the best chemotherapy regimen for initial management of low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), and first-line regimens vary by geography and institutional preference. Most regimens have not been compared head-to-head, and the level of evidence for efficacy is often limited to 3iiDii except as noted below. Even if there are differences in initial remission rate among the regimens, salvage with alternate regimens is very effective, and the ultimate cure rates are generally 99% or more. The initial regimen is generally given until a normal beta human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) (for the institution) is achieved and sustained for 3 consecutive weeks (or at least for one treatment cycle beyond normalization of the beta-hCG). A salvage regimen is instituted if any of the following occur:A plateau of the beta-hCG for 3 weeks (defined as a beta-hCG decrease of 10% or less for 3 consecutive weeks).A rise in beta-hCG of greater than 20%

    3. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy

      The size of the primary tumor is an important prognostic factor and should be carefully evaluated in choosing optimal therapy.[1] After surgical staging, patients found to have small volume para-aortic nodal disease and controllable pelvic disease may be cured with pelvic and para-aortic radiation therapy. Five randomized, phase III trials have shown an overall survival advantage for cisplatin-based therapy given concurrently with radiation therapy,[2,3,4,5,6,7,8] while one trial examining this regimen demonstrated no benefit.[9] The patient populations in these studies included women with Féderation Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) stages IB2 to IVA cervical cancer treated with primary radiation therapy and women with FIGO stages I to IIA disease who, at the time of primary surgery, were found to have poor prognostic factors, which include the following: Metastatic disease in pelvic lymph nodes.Parametrial disease.Positive surgical margins.Although the

    4. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

    5. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage Information for Endometrial Cancer

      Definitions: FIGOThe Féderation Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) and the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) have designated staging to define endometrial cancer; the FIGO system is most commonly used.[1,2]Carcinosarcomas should be staged as carcinoma.[2] FIGO stages are further subdivided by the histologic grade of the tumor, for example, stage IC G2.Table 1. Carcinoma of the EndometriumaStagea Adapted from FIGO Committee on Gynecologic Oncology.[1]b Either G1, G2, or G3 (G = grade).c Endocervical glandular involvement only should be considered as stage I and no longer as stage II.d Positive cytology has to be reported separately without changing the stage.IbTumor confined to the corpus uteri.IAbNo or less than half myometrial invasion.IBbInvasion equal to or more than half of the myometrium.IIbTumor invades cervical stroma but does not extend beyond the uterus.cIIIbLocal and/or regional spread of the tumor.IIIAbTumor invades the serosa of the corpus

    6. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Uterine Sarcoma

      Other PDQ summaries containing information related to uterine sarcoma.

    7. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Evidence of Harm

      Annually in the United States, an estimated 65 million women undergo cervical cancer screening;[1] about 3.9 million (6%) will be referred for further evaluation.[2] About 11,000 cases of invasive cervical cancer were diagnosed in 2008. Thus, Papanicolaou (Pap) test screening results in a large number of colposcopies for benign conditions.The major potential harm of screening for cervical cancer lies in the screening detection of many cytologic abnormalities such as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), the majority of which would never progress to cervical cancer. Women with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive ASCUS or LSIL on Pap testing are usually referred for colposcopy. Histological CIN 2+ is treated with cryotherapy or loop electrosurgical excision procedure. These procedures permanently alter the cervix and have consequences on fertility and pregnancy.[3] Younger women are more likely to acquire HPV

    8. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

      There are different types of treatment for patients with endometrial cancer.Different types of treatment are available for patients with endometrial cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Four types of standard treatment are used: SurgerySurgery (removing the cancer in an operation) is the most common treatment for endometrial cancer. The following surgical procedures may be used: Total hysterectomy: Surgery to remove the uterus, including the cervix. If the uterus and cervix are

    9. Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 22 / 2013)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

    10. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

      No standard treatment is available for patients with recurrent cervical cancer that has spread beyond the confines of a radiation or surgical field. For locally recurrent disease, pelvic exenteration can lead to a 5-year survival rate of 32% to 62% in selected patients.[1,2] These patients are appropriate candidates for clinical trials testing drug combinations or new anticancer agents. The Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) has reported on several randomized phase III trials, (GOG-0179 [NCT00003945], GOG-0240 [NCT00803062]) in this setting. Single-agent cisplatin administered intravenously at 50 mg/m² every 3 weeks was the most-used regimen to treat recurrent cervical cancer since it was initially introduced in the 1970s.[3,4]Various combinations containing cisplatin [3,4] failed to reach their primary endpoint of improving survival, however, a doubling of the cisplatin dose-rate did improve survival. Combinations with paclitaxel and with ifosfamide improved response rates

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