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Cervical Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cervical Cancer

  1. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Evidence of Harms

    Abnormal ultrasound typically requires further investigation including endometrial biopsy (sampling). The evidence is solid that endometrial sampling may result in discomfort, bleeding, infection, and rarely uterine perforation. A study designed to evaluate performance, patient acceptance, and cost-effectiveness of blind biopsy, hysteroscopy with biopsy, and ultrasound, in 683 women with vaginal bleeding, reported that minor events, including discomfort and distress, occurred in 16% of women who had hysteroscopy with biopsy, and in 10% of the women who had a blind biopsy.[1] A group of researchers studied 13,600 diagnostic and operative hysteroscopic procedures and found a lower complication rate among diagnostic procedures (0.13%) compared with operative procedures (0.28%).[2] Risks associated with false-positive test results include anxiety and additional diagnostic testing and surgery. Endometrial cancers may be missed on endometrial sampling and ultrasound.References: Critchley

  2. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Summary of Evidence

    Separate PDQ summaries on Prevention of Endometrial Cancer; Endometrial Cancer Treatment; and Uterine Sarcoma Treatment are also available. Benefits There is inadequate evidence that screening by ultrasonography (e.g.,transvaginal ultrasound [TVU]) or endometrial sampling would reduce the mortality from endometrial cancer. Description of the Evidence STUDY DESIGN: No studies have adequately ...

  3. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage Information for Cervical Cancer

    Cervical carcinoma has its origins at the squamous-columnar junction whether in the endocervical canal or on the portion of the cervix. The precursor lesion is dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN]), which can subsequently become invasive cancer. This process can be quite slow. Longitudinal studies have shown that in untreated patients with in situ cervical cancer, 30% to 70% will develop invasive carcinoma over a period of 10 to 12 years. However, in about 10% of patients, lesions can progress from in situ to invasive in a period of less than 1 year. As it becomes invasive, the tumor breaks through the basement membrane and invades the cervical stroma. Extension of the tumor in the cervix may ultimately manifest as ulceration, exophytic tumor, or extensive infiltration of underlying tissue including bladder or rectum. In addition to local invasion, carcinoma of the cervix can spread via the regional lymphatics or bloodstream.

  4. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types of gestational trophoblastic disease, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Hydatidiform MolesTreatment of a hydatidiform mole may include the following:Surgery (Dilatation and curettage with suction evacuation) to remove the tumor.After surgery, beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) blood tests are done every week until the β-hCG level returns to normal. Patients also have follow-up doctor visits monthly for up to 6 months. If the level of β-hCG does not return to normal or increases, it may mean the hydatidiform mole was not completely removed and it has become cancer. Pregnancy causes β-hCG levels to increase, so your doctor will ask you not to become pregnant until follow-up is finished.For disease that remains after surgery, treatment is usually chemotherapy.Check for U.S. clinical

  5. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

    Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a broad term encompassing both benign and malignant growths arising from products of conception in the uterus. GTD may be classified as follows:[1]Hydatidiform mole (HM).Complete HM.Partial HM.Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.Invasive mole.Choriocarcinoma.Placental-site trophoblastic tumor (very rare).Epithelioid trophoblastic tumor (even more rare).The reported incidence of GTD varies widely worldwide, from a low of 23 per 100,000 pregnancies (Paraguay) to a high of 1,299 per 100,000 pregnancies (Indonesia).[1] However, at least part of this variability is caused by differences in diagnostic criteria and reporting. The reported incidence in the United States is about 110 to 120 per 100,000 pregnancies. The reported incidence of choriocarcinoma, the most aggressive form of GTD, in the United States is about 2 to 7 per 100,000 pregnancies. The U.S. age-standardized (1960 World Population Standard) incidence rate of choriocarcinoma is

  6. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Cervical Cancer

    Cervical cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the cervix. The cervix is the lower,narrow end of the uterus (the hollow,pear-shaped organ where a fetus grows). The cervix leads from the uterus to the vagina (birth canal). Cervical cancer usually develops slowly over time. Before cancer appears in the cervix,the cells of the cervix go through changes ...

  7. Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Description of Evidence

    Incidence and MortalityAn estimated 12,340 new cervical cancers and 4,030 cervical cancer deaths will occur in the United States in 2013.[1] An additional 1,250,000 women will be diagnosed with precancers annually by cytology using the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. A continuum of pathologic changes may be diagnosed, ranging from atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance to low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) to invasive cancer. The precancerous conditions LSIL and HSIL are also referred to as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1, 2, and 3. Lesions can regress, persist, or progress to an invasive malignancy, with LSIL (CIN 1) more likely to regress spontaneously and HSIL (CIN 2/CIN 3) more likely to persist or progress. The average time for progression of CIN 3 to invasive cancer is estimated to be 10 to 15 years.[2]The incidence of cervical cancer has decreased dramatically with the advent and widespread

  8. Uterine Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    Surgery is often the principal means of diagnosis and is the primary treatment for all patients with uterine sarcoma. If the diagnosis is known, the extent of surgery is planned according to the stage of the tumor. Hysterectomy is usually performed when a uterine malignancy is suspected, except for rare instances when preservation of the uterus in a young patient is deemed safe for the type of cancer (e.g., a totally confined low-grade leiomyosarcoma in a woman who desires to retain childbearing potential). Medically suitable patients with the preoperative diagnosis of uterine sarcoma are considered candidates for abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and pelvic and periaortic selective lymphadenectomy. Cytologic washings are obtained from the pelvis and abdomen. Thorough examination of the diaphragm, omentum, and upper abdomen is performed. There is no firm evidence from a prospective study that adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation therapy is of benefit for patients

  9. Uterine Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Uterine Sarcoma

    Other PDQ summaries containing information related to uterine sarcoma.

  10. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with cervical cancer. Different types of treatment are available for patients with cervical cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Three types of standard treatment are used:Surgery Surgery (removing the cancer in an operation) is sometimes used to treat cervical cancer. The following surgical procedures may be used:Conization: A procedure to remove a cone-shaped piece of tissue from the cervix and cervical canal. A pathologist

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