Skip to content

    Cervical Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Cervical Cancer

    1. Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stages IIB, III, and IVA Cervical Cancer Treatment

      Either radiation therapy or radical hysterectomy results in cure rates of 75% to 80%. The selection of either option depends on patient factors and local expertise. A randomized trial reported identical 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival rates when radiation therapy was compared with radical hysterectomy.[1] The size of the primary tumor is an important prognostic factor and should be carefully evaluated in choosing optimal therapy.[2] For patients with bulky (>6 cm) endocervical squamous cell carcinomas or adenocarcinomas, treatment with high-dose radiation therapy will achieve local control and survival rates comparable to treatment with radiation therapy plus hysterectomy. Surgery after radiation therapy may be indicated for some patients with tumors confined to the cervix that respond incompletely to radiation therapy or in whom vaginal anatomy precludes optimal brachytherapy.[3] After surgical staging, patients found to have small volume para-aortic nodal

    2. Cervical Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062759-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Cervical Cancer Treatment

    3. Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

    4. Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

      Patients with endometrial cancer who have localized disease are usually curable by hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Best results are obtained with either of two standard treatments: hysterectomy or hysterectomy and adjuvant radiation therapy (when deep invasion of the myometrial muscle [50% of the depth] or grade 3 tumor with myometrial invasion is present). Results of two randomized trials on the use of external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with stage I disease did not show improved survival but did show reduced locoregional recurrence (3%–4% vs. 12%–14% after 5–6 years' median follow-up, P 50% myometrial invasion or grade 3 with <50% myometrial invasion).[4]Vaginal cuff

    5. Cervical Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Uterine Sarcoma

      The most common histologic types of uterine sarcomas include:Carcinosarcomas (mixed mesodermal sarcomas [40%–50%]).Leiomyosarcomas (30%).Endometrial stromal sarcomas (15%).The uterine neoplasm classification of the International Society of Gynecologic Pathologists and the World Health Organization uses the term carcinosarcomas for all primary uterine neoplasms containing malignant elements of both epithelial and stromal light microscopic appearances, regardless of whether malignant heterologous elements are present.[1]References: Silverberg SG, Major FJ, Blessing JA, et al.: Carcinosarcoma (malignant mixed mesodermal tumor) of the uterus. A Gynecologic Oncology Group pathologic study of 203 cases. Int J Gynecol Pathol 9 (1): 1-19, 1990.

    6. Understanding Cervical Cancer -- Prevention

      Read about cervical cancer prevention from the experts at WebMD.

    7. Understanding Cervical Cancer -- Treatment

      Find out how cervical cancer is diagnosed and treated.

    8. Understanding Cervical Cancer -- Symptoms

      Learn about the symptoms of cervical cancer from the experts at WebMD.

    9. Cervical Cancer - Cause

      Learn about cervical cancer and what causes it.

    10. Hysterectomy for Endometrial Cancer

      A hysterectomy is the surgical removal of a woman's uterus. A hysterectomy to remove endometrial cancer usually includes the removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes (bilateral salpingo - oophorectomy).

    Displaying 131 - 140 of 159 Articles << Prev Page 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Next >>

    Today on WebMD

    cancer cell
    HPV is the top cause. Find out more.
    doctor and patient
    Get to know the Symptoms.
     
    sauteed cherry tomatoes
    Fight cancer one plate at a time.
    Lung cancer xray
    See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
     
    Integrative Medicine Cancer Quiz
    QUIZ
    Lifestyle Tips for Depression Slideshow
    SLIDESHOW
     
    Screening Tests for Women
    Slideshow
    what is your cancer risk
    HEALTH CHECK