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Cervical Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cervical Cancer

  1. General Information About Cervical Cancer

    Cervical cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the cervix. The cervix is the lower,narrow end of the uterus (the hollow,pear-shaped organ where a fetus grows). The cervix connects the uterus to the vagina (birth canal). Cervical cancer usually develops slowly over time. Before cancer appears in the cervix,the cells of the cervix go through a series of changes in ...

  2. Description of the Evidence

    BackgroundNatural history, incidence, and mortalityIn the United States in 2013, it is estimated that 12,340 cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed and that 4,030 women will die of the disease.[1] These rates had been improving steadily. However, from 2005 to 2009, rates were stable in women younger than 50 years and decreased by 3.0% per year in women aged 50 years and older. From 2005 to 2009, mortality rates were stable among women of all ages.[1] This improvement has been attributed largely to screening with the Papanicolaou (Pap) test.Invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix results from the progression of preinvasive precursor lesions called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), or dysplasia. CIN is histologically graded into mild dysplasia (CIN 1), moderate dysplasia (CIN 2), or severe dysplasia (CIN 3). Not all of these lesions progress to invasive cancer; many mild and moderate lesions regress. A further

  3. Treatment Options for Gestational Trophoblastic Disease

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types of gestational trophoblastic disease, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Hydatidiform MolesTreatment of a hydatidiform mole may include the following:Surgery (Dilatation and curettage with suction evacuation) to remove the tumor.After surgery, beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) blood tests are done every week until the β-hCG level returns to normal. Patients also have follow-up doctor visits monthly for up to 6 months. If the level of β-hCG does not return to normal or increases, it may mean the hydatidiform mole was not completely removed and it has become cancer. Pregnancy causes β-hCG levels to increase, so your doctor will ask you not to become pregnant until follow-up is finished.For disease that remains after surgery, treatment is usually chemotherapy.Check for U.S. clinical

  4. Changes to This Summary (02 / 27 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.SignificanceUpdated statistics with estimated new cases and deaths for 2013 (cited American Cancer Society as reference 1).This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  5. Recurrent and Resistant Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia

    Recurrent gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the uterus or in other parts of the body.Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia that does not respond to treatment is called resistant GTN.

  6. Stage Information for Uterine Sarcoma

    The FIGO staging for carcinoma of the corpus uteri has been applied to uterine sarcoma.[

  7. Get More Information From NCI

    This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information on endometrial cancer treatment.

  8. Cervical Dysplasia

    WebMD discusses what cervical dysplasia is and its causes and treatments.

  9. Cryotherapy for Abnormal Cervical Cell Changes

    Cryotherapy destroys abnormal tissue on the cervix by freezing it. Cryotherapy destroys some normal tissue along with the abnormal tissue.

  10. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP) for Abnormal Cervical Cell Changes

    The loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) uses a thin, low-voltage electrified wire loop to cut out abnormal tissue in the cervix.

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