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Cervical Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cervical Cancer

  1. Cellular Classification of Endometrial Cancer

    The most common endometrial cancer cell type is endometrioid adenocarcinoma, which is composed of malignant glandular epithelial elements; an admixture of squamous metaplasia is not uncommon. Adenosquamous tumors contain malignant elements of both glandular and squamous epithelium;[1] clear cell and papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium are tumors that are histologically similar to those noted in the ovary and the fallopian tube, and the prognosis is worse for these tumors.[2] Mucinous, squamous, and undifferentiated tumors are rarely encountered. Frequency of endometrial cancer cell types is as follows: Endometrioid (75%–80%). Ciliated adenocarcinoma.Secretory adenocarcinoma.Papillary or villoglandular.Adenocarcinoma with squamous differentiation.Adenoacanthoma.Adenosquamous.Uterine papillary serous (<10%).Mucinous (1%).Clear cell (4%).Squamous cell (<1%).Mixed (10%).Undifferentiated.References: Zaino RJ, Kurman R, Herbold D, et al.: The significance of squamous

  2. Epithelioid Trophoblastic Tumor Treatment

    These tumors are exceedingly rare. There is little information to guide therapy. However, they are similar in behavior and prognosis to placental-site trophoblastic tumors, so it is reasonable to manage them similarly. (Refer to the Placental-Site Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor Treatment section of this summary for more information.) Only a minority of these tumors are malignant in behavior, but they are not very responsive to systemic therapy. A variety of chemotherapy regimens have been used.[1]Current Clinical TrialsCheck for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with epithelioid trophoblastic tumor. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.References: Palmer JE, Macdonald M, Wells M, et al.: Epithelioid trophoblastic tumor: a review of the literature. J Reprod Med 53 (7): 465-75,

  3. Cervical Cancer

    WebMD provides an overview of cervical cancer, including causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  4. Understanding Cervical Cancer -- Prevention

    Read about cervical cancer prevention from the experts at WebMD.

  5. Understanding Cervical Cancer -- the Basics

    Learn the basics about cervical cancer and what causes it from WebMD.

  6. Understanding Cervical Cancer -- Treatment

    Find out how cervical cancer is diagnosed and treated.

  7. Understanding Cervical Cancer -- Symptoms

    Learn about the symptoms of cervical cancer from the experts at WebMD.

  8. Cone Biopsy (Conization) for Abnormal Cervical Cell Changes

    A cone biopsy is an extensive form of a cervical biopsy. It is called a cone biopsy because a cone-shaped wedge of tissue is removed from the cervix and examined under a microscope.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Laser Surgery for Abnormal Cervical Cell Changes

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) laser beam is used to destroy (vaporize) abnormal cervical tissue that can be seen through a magnifying viewing instrument (colposcope).

  10. Colposcopy and Cervical Biopsy

    Colposcopy is a way for your doctor to use a special magnifying device to look at your vulva, vagina, and cervix.

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