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Cervical Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cervical Cancer

  1. Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    No standard treatment is available for patients with recurrent cervical cancer that has spread beyond the confines of a radiation or surgical field. For locally recurrent disease, pelvic exenteration can lead to a 5-year survival rate of 32% to 62% in selected patients.[1,2] These patients are appropriate candidates for clinical trials testing drug combinations or new anticancer agents. The Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) has reported on several randomized phase III trials, (GOG-0179 [NCT00003945], GOG-0240 [NCT00803062]) in this setting. Single-agent cisplatin administered intravenously at 50 mg/m² every 3 weeks was the most-used regimen to treat recurrent cervical cancer since it was initially introduced in the 1970s.[3,4]Various combinations containing cisplatin [3,4] failed to reach their primary endpoint of improving survival, however, a doubling of the cisplatin dose-rate did improve survival. Combinations with paclitaxel and with ifosfamide improved response rates

  2. Changes to This Summary (04 / 12 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. This summary was renamed from Gestational Trophoblastic Tumors and Neoplasia Treatment.General Information About Gestational Trophoblastic Disease This section was renamed from General Information About Gestational Trophoblastic Tumors and Neoplasia.Revised text to state that gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a broad term encompassing both benign and malignant growths arising from products of conception in the uterus.Revised text to state that GTD may be classified as: hydatidiform mole (HM) including complete HM and partial HM; gestational trophoblastic neoplasia including Invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, and placental-site trophoblastic tumor; and, epithelioid trophoblastic tumor.Cellular Classification of Gestational Trophoblastic DiseaseThis section was renamed from Cellular

  3. Changes to This Summary (02 / 26 / 2013)

    Description of the EvidenceUpdated statistics with estimated new cases and deaths for 2013 (cited American Cancer Society as reference 1).Added Howlader et al. as reference 13.Revised text to state that among women older than 65 years, cervical cancer mortality for black women is more than 150% higher than for white women.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  4. About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about cervical cancer screening. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process in

  5. About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  6. Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  7. Cervical Cancer Screening

    Tests are used to screen for different types of cancer.Some screening tests are used because they have been shown to be helpful both in finding cancers early and in decreasing the chance of dying from these cancers. Other tests are used because they have been shown to find cancer in some people; however, it has not been proven in clinical trials that use of these tests will decrease the risk of dying from cancer.Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and most benefits. Cancer screening trials also are meant to show whether early detection (finding cancer before it causes symptoms) decreases a person's chance of dying from the disease. For some types of cancer, the chance of recovery is better if the disease is found and treated at an early stage.Clinical trials that study cancer screening methods are taking place in many parts of the country. Information about ongoing clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.Studies show that screening for

  8. Overview

    Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Cervical Cancer Screening and Cervical Cancer Treatment are also available. Avoidance of Human Papillomavirus Infection Based on solid evidence,the following measures are effective to avoid human papillomavirus (HPV) infection,and thus cervical cancer: ABSTINENCE FROM SEXUAL ACTIVITY MAGNITUDE OF EFFECT: ABSTINENCE PREVENTS HPV INFECTION. Study Design: Evidence ...

  9. Stage IA Cervical Cancer

    Equivalent treatment options:Total hysterectomy.[1] If the depth of invasion is less than 3 mm proven by cone biopsy with clear margins [2] and no vascular or lymphatic channel invasion is noted, the frequency of lymph node involvement is sufficiently low that lymph node dissection is not required. Oophorectomy is optional and should be deferred for younger women. Conization. If the depth of invasion is less than 3 mm, no vascular or lymphatic channel invasion is noted, and the margins of the cone are negative, conization alone may be appropriate in patients wishing to preserve fertility.[1]Modified radical hysterectomy. For patients with tumor invasion between 3 mm and 5 mm, radical hysterectomy with pelvic node dissection has been recommended because of a reported risk of lymph node metastasis of as much as 10%.[2] However, a study suggests that the rate of lymph-node involvement in this group of patients may be much lower and questions whether conservative therapy might be

  10. Overview

    Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Cervical Cancer Prevention,Cervical Cancer Treatment,and Levels of Evidence for Cancer Screening and Prevention Studies are also available. Screening With the Papanicolaou (Pap) Test: Benefits Based on solid evidence,regular screening of appropriate women for cervical cancer with the Pap test reduces mortality from cervical cancer. The benefits of screening ...

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