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    Amyloidosis

    Risk Factors for Amyloidosis

    Men get amyloidosis more often than women. Your risk for amyloidosis increases as you grow older. Amyloidosis affects 15% of patients with a form of cancer called multiple myeloma.

    Amyloidosis may also occur in people with end-stage kidney disease who are on dialysis for a long time (see "Dialysis-related amyloidosis" above).

    Symptoms of Amyloidosis

    Symptoms of amyloidosis are often subtle. They can also vary greatly depending on where the amyloid protein is collecting in the body. It is important to note that the symptoms described below may be due to a variety of different health problems. Only your doctor can make a diagnosis of amyloidosis.

    General symptoms of amyloidosis may include:

    Cardiac (Heart) Amyloidosis

    Amyloid deposits in the heart can make the walls of the heart muscle stiff. They can also make the heart muscle weaker and affect the electrical rhythm of the heart. This condition can cause less blood to flow to your heart. Eventually, your heart will no longer be able to pump. If amyloidosis affects your heart, you may have:

    Renal (Kidney) Amyloidosis

    Your kidneys filter waste and toxins from your blood. Amyloid deposits in the kidneys make it hard for them to do this job. When your kidneys do not work properly, water and dangerous toxins build up in your body. If amyloidosis affects the kidneys, you may have:

    • Signs of kidney failure, including swelling of the feet and ankles and puffiness around the eyes.
    • High levels of protein in your urine.

    Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis

    Amyloid deposits along your gastrointestinal (GI) tract slow down the muscle contractions that help move food through your intestines. This interferes with digestion. If amyloidosis affects your GI tract, you may have:

    Liver involvement can cause liver enlargement, fluid buildup in the body, and abnormal liver function tests.

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