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    Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • None

    General Discussion

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which is a group of related malignancies (cancers) that affect the lymphatic system (lymphomas). The lymphatic system functions as part of the immune system and helps to protect the body against infection and disease. It consists of a network of tubular channels (lymph vessels) that drain a thin watery fluid known as lymph from different areas of the body into the bloodstream.

    Lymph accumulates in the tiny spaces between tissue cells and contains proteins, fats, and certain white blood cells known as lymphocytes. As lymph moves through the lymphatic system, it is filtered by a network of small structures known as lymph nodes that help to remove microorganisms (e.g., viruses, bacteria, etc.) and other foreign bodies. Groups of lymph nodes are located throughout the body, including in the neck, under the arms (axillae), at the elbows, and in the chest, abdomen, and groin. Lymphocytes are stored within lymph nodes and may also be found in other lymphatic tissues. In addition to the lymph nodes, the lymphatic system includes the spleen, which filters worn-out red blood cells and produces lymphocytes, and bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside the cavities of bones that manufactures blood cells. Lymphatic tissue or circulating lymphocytes may also be located in other regions of the body. There are two main types of lymphocytes: B-lymphocytes (B-cells), which may produce specific antibodies to "neutralize" certain invading microorganisms, and T-lymphocytes (T-cells), which may directly destroy microorganisms or assist in the activities of other lymphocytes.

    AITL results from errors in the production of a T-cell or transformation of a T-cell into a malignant cell. Abnormal, uncontrolled growth and multiplication (proliferation) of malignant T-cells may lead to enlargement of a specific lymph node region or regions; involvement of other lymphatic tissues, such as the spleen and bone marrow; and spread to other bodily tissues and organs. A key and differentiating aspect of AITL is dysfunction of the immune system, which can lead to a variety of symptoms. Individuals with AITL may develop a rash, persistent fever, unintended weight loss, tissue swelling due to the accumulation of fluid (edema) and additional symptoms. The exact, underlying cause of AITL is not fully understood.

    Resources

    Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
    1311 Mamaroneck Avenue
    Suite 310
    White Plains, NY 10605
    Tel: (914)949-5213
    Fax: (914)949-6691
    Tel: (800)955-4572
    Email: infocenter@LLS.org
    Internet: http://www.LLS.org

    American Cancer Society, Inc.
    250 Williams NW St
    Ste 6000
    Atlanta, GA 30303
    USA
    Tel: (404)320-3333
    Tel: (800)227-2345
    TDD: (866)228-4327
    Internet: http://www.cancer.org

    National Cancer Institute Physician Data Query
    Office of Communications and Education
    Public Inquiries Office
    6116 Executive Blvd
    Suite 300
    Bethesda, MD 20892-8322
    Tel: (800)422-6237
    Email: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/cancerdatabase

    NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
    Office of Communications and Government Relations
    6610 Rockledge Drive, MSC 6612
    Bethesda, MD 20892-6612
    Tel: (301)496-5717
    Fax: (301)402-3573
    Tel: (866)284-4107
    TDD: (800)877-8339
    Email: ocpostoffice@niaid.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/

    National Cancer Institute
    6116 Executive Blvd Suite 300
    Bethesda, MD 20892-8322
    USA
    Tel: (301)435-3848
    Tel: (800)422-6237
    TDD: (800)332-8615
    Email: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.cancer.gov

    Cancer Hope Network
    2 North Road
    Suite A
    Chester, NJ 07930
    Tel: (908)879-4039
    Fax: (908)879-6518
    Tel: (800)552-4366
    Email: info@cancerhopenetwork.org
    Internet: http://www.cancerhopenetwork.org

    OncoLink: The University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center Resource
    3400 Spruce Street
    2 Donner
    Philadelphia, PA 19104-4283
    USA
    Tel: (215)349-8895
    Fax: (215)349-5445
    Email: hampshire@uphs.upenn.edu
    Internet: http://www.oncolink.upenn.edu

    Lymphoma Research Foundation
    115 Broadway
    Suite 1301
    New York, NY 10006
    USA
    Tel: (212)349-2910
    Fax: (212)349-2886
    Tel: (800)235-6848
    Email: LRF@lymphoma.org
    Internet: http://www.lymphoma.org

    Lymphoma Foundation Canada
    16-1375 Southdown Road
    Suite 236
    Mississauga
    Ontario, L5J 2Z1
    Canada
    Tel: 9058225135
    Fax: 9058149152
    Tel: 8666595556
    Email: info@lymphoma.ca
    Internet: http://www.lymphoma.ca

    Lymphoma Association (UK)
    PO Box 386
    Aylesbury, HP20 2GA
    United Kingdom
    Tel: 01296619400
    Email: information@lymphomas.org.uk
    Internet: www.lymphomas.org.uk

    International Cancer Alliance for Research and Education (ICARE)
    4853 Cordell Avenue
    Suite 14
    Bethesda, MD 20814
    Tel: (301)656-3461
    Fax: (301)654-8684
    Tel: (800)422-7361
    Email: info@icare.org
    Internet: http://www.icare.org

    Cancer Care, Inc.
    275 Seventh Avenue
    New York, NY 10001
    Tel: (212)712-8400
    Fax: (212)719-0263
    Tel: (800)813-4673
    Email: info@cancercare.org
    Internet: http://www.cancercare.org

    Rare Cancer Alliance
    1649 North Pacana Way
    Green Valley, AZ 85614
    USA
    Internet: http://www.rare-cancer.org

    Friends of Cancer Research
    1800 M Street NW
    Suite 1050 South
    Washington, DC 22202
    Tel: (202)944-6700
    Email: info@focr.org
    Internet: http://www.focr.org

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 2/16/2011
    Copyright 1988, 1989, 2000, 2011 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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