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Leukemia & Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Leukemia & Lymphoma

  1. Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    A look at the causes, symptoms, and treatment of mantle cell lymphoma, a cancer that affects white blood cells known as lymphocytes.

  2. Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    WebMD explains the causes, symptoms, and treatment of small lymphocytic lymphoma, a cancer that affects a type of white blood cell called a "lymphocyte," which helps your body fight infection.

  3. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Learn about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, a blood cancer.

  4. Follicular Lymphoma

    Find out about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of follicular lymphoma, a type of cancer.

  5. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview for Adult NHL

    Treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) depends on the histologic type and stage. Many of the improvements in survival have been made using clinical trials (experimental therapy) that have attempted to improve on the best available accepted therapy (conventional or standard therapy). In asymptomatic patients with indolent forms of advanced NHL, treatment may be deferred until the patient becomes symptomatic as the disease progresses. When treatment is deferred, the clinical course of patients with indolent NHL varies; frequent and careful observation is required so that effective treatment can be initiated when the clinical course of the disease accelerates. Some patients have a prolonged indolent course, but others have disease that rapidly evolves into more aggressive types of NHL that require immediate treatment.Radiation techniques differ somewhat from those used in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. The dose of radiation therapy usually varies from 25 Gy to 50 Gy and is

  6. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment for Aggressive, Noncontiguous Stage II / III / IV Adult NHL

    The treatment of choice for patients with advanced stages of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is combination chemotherapy, either alone or supplemented by local-field radiation therapy.[1]The following drug combinations are referred to in this section:ACVBP: doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vindesine + bleomycin + prednisone.CHOP: cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisone.CNOP: cyclophosphamide + mitoxantrone + vincristine + prednisone.m-BACOD: methotrexate + bleomycin + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vincristine + dexamethasone + leucovorin.MACOP-B: methotrexate + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vincristine + prednisone fixed dose + bleomycin + leucovorin.ProMACE CytaBOM: prednisone + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + etoposide + cytarabine + bleomycin + vincristine + methotrexate + leucovorin.R-CHOP: rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, + cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisone.Standard Treatment Options for

  7. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Different types of treatment are available for children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Because cancer in children is rare, taking part in a clinical trial should be considered. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment. Children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma should have their treatment planned by a team of doctors with expertise in treating childhood cancer.Treatment will be overseen by a pediatric oncologist, a doctor who specializes in treating children with cancer. The pediatric

  8. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 09 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Cellular Classification of Childhood NHLAdded text to state that in a study of adolescents with stage III primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma treated with FAB/LMB-96 therapy, the 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was 66%, versus 85% for adolescents with nonmediastinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (cited Gerrard et al. as reference 24 and level of evidence 2A). Also added text about a single-arm study in adults that showed excellent disease-free survival utilizing the DA-EPOCH-R regimen (dose-adjusted etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab; usually six cycles) with filgrastim and no radiation therapy. The 5-year EFS was 93% and overall survival (OS) was 97% (cited Dunleavy et al. as reference 25 and level of evidence 2A).Revised text to state that

  9. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHL

    Although localized presentations are uncommon in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the goal of treatment should be to cure the disease in patients who are shown to have truly localized occurrence after undergoing appropriate staging procedures.Standard Treatment Options for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHLStandard treatment options for indolent, stage I and contiguous stage II adult NHL include the following:Radiation therapy.Rituximab with or without chemotherapy.Watchful waiting.Other therapies as designated for patients with advanced-stage disease.The National Lymphocare Study identified 471 patients with stage I follicular lymphoma. Of those patients, 206 were rigorously staged with a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy, and computed tomography (CT) scans or positive-emission tomography (PET-CT) scans.[1] Nonrandomized treatments included radiation therapy (27%), rituximab-chemotherapy (R-chemotherapy) (28%), watchful waiting (17%), R-chemotherapy plus radiation therapy

  10. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lymph system.

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