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Leukemia & Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Leukemia & Lymphoma

  1. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia is a malignant blood disorder in which there is an increased number of white blood cells formed in the lymphoid tissue. This uncontrolled buildup and enlargement of lymphoid tissue can occur in various sites of the body such as the lymph nodes,spleen,bone marrow,and lungs. There are many different forms of Leukemia which are all characterized by an overabundance ...

  2. Leukemia, Hairy Cell

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare type of blood cancer characterized by abnormal changes in white blood cells known as B lymphocytes. The bone marrow creates too many of these defective cells,known as "hairy cells" because of the thin hair-like projections found on their surface. Overproduction and accumulation of hairy cells causes a deficiency of normal blood cells (pancytopenia),...

  3. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma, see the following: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Non-Hodgkin LymphomaDrugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin LymphomaTargeted Cancer TherapiesUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies and Targeted Therapies for Lymphoma)Biological Therapies for Cancer: Questions and AnswersFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  4. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ImportantIt is possible that the main title of the report Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

  5. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 22 / 2014)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Aggressive Non-Hodgkin LymphomaAn editorial change was made to this section.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  6. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Childhood NHL

    Cellular Classification and Clinical PresentationIn children, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is distinct from the more common forms of lymphoma observed in adults. While lymphomas in adults are more commonly low or intermediate grade, almost all NHL that occurs in children is high grade.[1,2,3] The World Health Organization (WHO) has classified NHL on the basis of the following: (1) phenotype (i.e., B-lineage and T-lineage or natural killer [NK] cell lineage) and (2) differentiation (i.e., precursor vs. mature).[4]On the basis of clinical response to treatment, NHL of childhood and adolescence currently falls into the following three therapeutically relevant categories: Mature B-cell NHL (Burkitt and Burkitt-like lymphoma/leukemia and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma).Lymphoblastic lymphoma (primarily precursor T-cell lymphoma and, less frequently, precursor B-cell lymphoma).Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (mature T-cell or null-cell lymphomas).NHL associated with

  7. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During Pregnancy

    General Information About NHL During PregnancyNon-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) occur more frequently than Hodgkin lymphoma in an older population. This age difference may account for fewer reports of NHL in pregnant patients.[1]Stage Information for NHL During PregnancyTo avoid exposure to ionizing radiation, magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred tool for staging evaluation.[2] (Refer to the Stage Information for Adult NHL section of this summary for more information.)Treatment Option Overview for NHL During PregnancyTable 5. Treatment Options for NHL During PregnancyStageStandard Treatment OptionsIndolent NHL During PregnancyDelay treatment until after deliveryAggressive NHL During PregnancyImmediate therapyEarly delivery, when feasibleTermination of pregnancyIndolent NHL During PregnancyTreatment may be delayed for those women with an indolent NHL.Aggressive NHL During PregnancyImmediate therapyAccording to anecdotal case series, most NHLs in pregnant patients are aggressive,

  8. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Adult NHL

    A pathologist should be consulted prior to a biopsy because some studies require special preparation of tissue (e.g., frozen tissue). Knowledge of cell surface markers and immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements may help with diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. The clonal excess of light-chain immunoglobulin may differentiate malignant from reactive cells. Since the prognosis and the approach to treatment are influenced by histopathology, outside biopsy specimens should be carefully reviewed by a hematopathologist who is experienced in diagnosing lymphomas. Although lymph node biopsies are recommended whenever possible, sometimes immunophenotypic data are sufficient to allow diagnosis of lymphoma when fine-needle aspiration cytology is preferred.[1,2]Historical Classification SystemsHistorically, uniform treatment of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has been hampered by the lack of a uniform classification system. In 1982, results of a consensus

  9. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment for Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma is a very aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), which often occurs in young patients, but not exclusively. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is commonly associated with large mediastinal masses and has a high predilection for disseminating to bone marrow and the central nervous system (CNS). The treatment paradigms are based on trials for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) since lymphoblastic lymphoma and ALL are considered different manifestations of the same biologic disease. (Refer to the PDQ summary on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment for more information.) Treatment is usually patterned after ALL. Intensive combination chemotherapy with CNS prophylaxis is the standard treatment of this aggressive histologic type of NHL. Radiation therapy is sometimes given to areas of bulky tumor masses. Since these forms of NHL tend to progress quickly, combination chemotherapy is instituted rapidly once the diagnosis has been confirmed.The most important aspects

  10. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    After adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the lymph system or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out the type of cancer and if cancer cells have spread within the lymph system or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage of the disease in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:Complete blood count (CBC) with differential: A procedure in which a sample of blood is drawn and checked for the following:The number of red blood cells and platelets.The number and type of white blood cells.The amount of hemoglobin (the protein that carries oxygen) in the red blood cells.The portion of the blood sample made up of red blood cells.Complete blood count (CBC). Blood is collected by inserting a needle into a vein and allowing the

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