Skip to content

    Leukemia & Lymphoma

    Medical Reference Related to Leukemia & Lymphoma

    1. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Essential Thrombocythemia

      Essential thrombocythemia is a disease in which too many platelets are made in the bone marrow.Essential thrombocythemia causes an abnormal increase in the number of platelets made in the blood and bone marrow.Patients with essential thrombocythemia may have no symptoms.Essential thrombocythemia often does not cause early symptoms. It is sometimes found during a routine blood test. The following symptoms may be caused by essential thrombocytopenia or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following problems:Headache.Burning or tingling in the hands or feet.Redness and warmth of the hands or feet.Vision or hearing problems.Platelets are sticky. When there are too many platelets, they may clump together and make it hard for the blood to flow. Clots may form in blood vessels and there may also be increased bleeding. These can cause serious health problems such as stroke or heart attack.Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options

    2. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

      There are different types of treatment for children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Different types of treatment are available for children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Because cancer in children is rare, taking part in a clinical trial should be considered. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment. Children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma should have their treatment planned by a team of doctors with expertise in treating childhood cancer.Treatment will be overseen by a pediatric oncologist, a doctor who specializes in treating children with cancer. The pediatric

    3. Primary Gastric Lymphoma

      Non-Hodgkins Type Gastric Lymphoma is a rare form of stomach cancer characterized by unrestrained growth of certain lymphoid cells of the stomach. This form of cancer is thought to arise from certain white blood cells (lymphocytes) within lymphoid tissue of the stomach's mucous membrane (mucosa). Non-Hodgkins Type Gastric Lymphoma may be a primary disease process (primary lymphoma) or may ...

    4. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

      Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a disease in which too many white blood cells are made in the bone marrow. See the PDQ summary on Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment for information on diagnosis, staging, and treatment.

    5. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (06 / 06 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Cellular Classification of Childhood NHLAdded text to state that in a study of adolescents with stage III primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma treated with FAB/LMB-96 therapy, the 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was 66%, versus 85% for adolescents with nonmediastinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (cited Gerrard et al. as reference 24 and level of evidence 2A). Also added text about a single-arm study in adults that showed excellent disease-free survival utilizing the DA-EPOCH-R regimen (dose-adjusted etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab; usually six cycles) with filgrastim and no radiation therapy. The 5-year EFS was 93% and overall survival (OS) was 97% (cited Dunleavy et al. as reference 25 and level of evidence 2A).Revised text to state that

    6. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

      After adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the lymph system or to other parts of the body. The process used to find out the type of cancer and if cancer cells have spread within the lymph system or to other parts of the body is called staging. The information gathered from the staging process determines the stage of the disease. It is important to know the stage of the disease in order to plan treatment. The following tests and procedures may be used in the staging process:Complete blood count (CBC) with differential: A procedure in which a sample of blood is drawn and checked for the following:The number of red blood cells and platelets.The number and type of white blood cells.The amount of hemoglobin (the protein that carries oxygen) in the red blood cells.The portion of the blood sample made up of red blood cells.Complete blood count (CBC). Blood is collected by inserting a needle into a vein and allowing the

    7. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHL

      Although localized presentations are uncommon in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the goal of treatment should be to cure the disease in patients who are shown to have truly localized occurrence after undergoing appropriate staging procedures.Standard Treatment Options for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHLStandard treatment options for indolent, stage I and contiguous stage II adult NHL include the following:Radiation therapy.Rituximab with or without chemotherapy.Watchful waiting.Other therapies as designated for patients with advanced-stage disease.The National Lymphocare Study identified 471 patients with stage I follicular lymphoma. Of those patients, 206 were rigorously staged with a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy, and computed tomography (CT) scans or positive-emission tomography (PET-CT) scans.[1] Nonrandomized treatments included radiation therapy (27%), rituximab-chemotherapy (R-chemotherapy) (28%), watchful waiting (17%), R-chemotherapy plus radiation therapy

    8. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment for Aggressive, Noncontiguous Stage II / III / IV Adult NHL

      The treatment of choice for patients with advanced stages of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is combination chemotherapy, either alone or supplemented by local-field radiation therapy.[1]The following drug combinations are referred to in this section:ACVBP: doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vindesine + bleomycin + prednisone.CHOP: cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisone.CNOP: cyclophosphamide + mitoxantrone + vincristine + prednisone.m-BACOD: methotrexate + bleomycin + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vincristine + dexamethasone + leucovorin.MACOP-B: methotrexate + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vincristine + prednisone fixed dose + bleomycin + leucovorin.ProMACE CytaBOM: prednisone + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + etoposide + cytarabine + bleomycin + vincristine + methotrexate + leucovorin.R-CHOP: rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, + cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisone.Standard Treatment Options for

    9. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062958-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment

    10. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062707-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment

    Displaying 31 - 40 of 132 Articles << Prev Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next >>

    Today on WebMD

    stem cells
    What are they and why do we need them?
    Lung cancer xray
    See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
     
    sauteed cherry tomatoes
    Fight cancer one plate at a time.
    Ovarian cancer illustration
    Do you know the symptoms?
     
    Vitamin D
    SLIDESHOW
    New Treatments For Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma
    FEATURE
     
    Lifestyle Tips for Depression Slideshow
    SLIDESHOW
    Pets Improve Your Health
    SLIDESHOW