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    Newer Drug Helps Older Myeloma Patients

    Treatment may extend survival for patients over 65, researchers say

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Amy Norton

    HealthDay Reporter

    Recommended Related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    What Puts You at Risk for Multiple Myeloma?

    No one knows exactly what causes multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer, but certain things can raise your chances of getting it. Your age, race, and whether you have a family member with the disease all play a role. But just because you have one of these risks doesn't mean you'll get sick. And you can come down with the condition even without them.

    Read the What Puts You at Risk for Multiple Myeloma? article > >

    WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A cancer drug that targets the immune system may help improve the outlook for older adults with multiple myeloma, though a stem cell transplant remains the standard of care for relatively younger patients.

    Those are some of the findings from two studies in the Sept. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

    Multiple myeloma is a cancer that begins in certain white blood cells. In the United States, it accounts for about 1 percent of cancers, and for those who develop it, it's often deadly. About 45 percent of Americans with the disease are still alive five years after diagnosis, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

    For years, the standard treatment -- at least for patients younger than 65 -- has involved removing blood-forming stem cells from the patient's bone marrow or bloodstream, then using high-dose chemo to kill off the myeloma cells. Afterward, the stored stem cells are infused back into the patient, where they aid in recovery.

    That extends people's cancer remission, but it's not a cure, said Dr. David Avigan, who treats myeloma patients at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

    In the past five to 10 years, Avigan said, "novel drugs" have arrived on the market, and in studies they've sent some patients into complete remission.

    "That's raised the question, are transplants still needed?" said Avigan, who wrote an editorial published with the studies. "Or can you get everything you want with these newer drugs? That's an important question, and one that patients often ask."

    The answer, based on one of the new studies, is that transplants remain the best option for patients younger than 65. (Because transplants carry substantial risks, they aren't usually done in older or sicker patients.)

    In that study, Italian and Israeli researchers randomly assigned 273 myeloma patients under 65 years old to have a stem cell transplant and high-dose chemo, or a combination of drugs -- melphalan, prednisone and lenalidomide.

    The transplant patients typically went 43 months without their cancer progressing versus 22 months for patients on the drug combo. And four years later, 82 percent of transplant patients were still alive, compared with 65 percent of the drug patients.

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