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    Leukemia, Lymphoma / Blood Cancers Mini Guide TOC - Treatment Overview

    Treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) depends on:

    • The stage of the disease.
    • The type of lymphoma. The kind of treatment you have will depend on whether you have B-cell or T-cell lymphoma and whether it is fast-growing or slow-growing.
    • The size of the tumor, where the lymphoma is located, and what organs are involved.
    • Your general health.

    Your doctor will work with you and your medical team (which may include an oncologist, a hematologist, and an oncology nurse) to come up with your treatment plan.

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    Treatment options

    Side effects

    A common concern of cancer patients are the side effects of treatments like chemotherapy and radiation. Your medical team will let you know ahead of time what side effects you can expect and help you manage them. And there are things you can do at home. To learn more, see Home Treatment.

    Recurrent NHL

    Sometimes NHL comes back after treatment. This is called recurrence or relapse. Treatments for recurrent NHL include chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of the two. This treatment may be followed by a stem cell transplant.

    Follow-up care

    You will need regular exams after you have been treated for NHL.

    Let your doctor know if you have any problems as soon as they appear.

    Support

    Finding out that you have cancer can change your life. You may feel like your world has turned upside down and you have lost all control. Talking with family, friends, or a counselor can really help. Ask your doctor about support groups. Or call the American Cancer Society (1-800-227-2345) or visit its website at www.cancer.org.

    For support in managing the many changes that having cancer can bring, see the topic Getting Support When You Have Cancer.

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