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Medical Reference Related to Cancer

  1. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000597824-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Treatment

  2. Pruritus (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Etiology / Pathophysiology

    Hematologic disorders that cause pruritus include polycythemia vera. Some conditions that cause iron deficiency, including exfoliative skin disorder, also cause pruritus. Diabetes and thyrotoxicosis are endocrine causes of pruritus.[1]Pruritus is a frequent clinical manifestation of people with AIDS, AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma, and AIDS-related opportunistic infections. Pruritus with or without rash has been reported in approximately 84% of people with AIDS and 35.5% of those with AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma. The incidence of pruritus associated with AIDS-related opportunistic infections approaches 100%.[2]Various malignant diseases are known to produce pruritus. Hodgkin lymphoma causes pruritus in 10% to 25% of patients. In some instances, pruritus precedes diagnosis of the lymphoma [1] and may be an indicator of a less favorable prognosis when associated with significant fever or weight loss (B symptoms).[3] Pruritus associated with Hodgkin lymphoma is characterized by symptoms

  3. Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Intraocular (Uveal) Melanoma

    Recurrent intraocular melanoma is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The melanoma may come back in the eye or in other parts of the body.

  4. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ®): Supportive care - Patient Information [NCI] - Meeting the Patient's Spiritual and Religious Needs

    To help patients with spiritual needs during cancer care, medical staff will listen to the wishes of the patient.Spirituality and religion are very personal issues. Patients should expect doctors and caregivers to respect their religious and spiritual beliefs and concerns. Patients with cancer who rely on spirituality to cope with the disease should be able to count on the health care team to give them support. This may include giving patients information about people or groups that can help with spiritual or religious needs. Most hospitals have chaplains, but not all outpatient settings do. Patients who do not want to discuss spirituality during cancer care should also be able to count on the health care team to respect their wishes.Doctors and caregivers will try to respond to their patients' concerns, but may not take part in patients' religious practices or discuss specific religious beliefs.The health care team will help with a patient's spiritual needs when setting goals and

  5. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  6. 714-X (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the use of 714-X in the treatment of people with cancer. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the

  7. Chordoma

    Important It is possible that the main title of the report Chordoma is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report. ...

  8. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a childhood disease in which too many myelocytes and monocytes (immature white blood cells) are made in the bone marrow.Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare childhood cancer that occurs more often in children younger than 2 years. Children who have neurofibromatosis type 1 and males have an increased risk of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. In JMML, the body tells too many blood stem cells to become two types of white blood cells called myelocytes and monocytes. Some of these blood stem cells never become mature white blood cells. These immature white blood cells are called blasts. Over time, the myelocytes, monocytes, and blasts crowd out the red blood cells and platelets in the bone marrow. When this happens, infection, anemia, or easy bleeding may occur.Possible signs of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia include fever, feeling very tired, and weight loss.These and other symptoms may be caused by JMML. Other conditions may cause the

  9. AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  10. Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (06 / 24 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid LeukemiaAdded text to state that the choice of anthracycline and the anthracycline dose-intensity may influence the survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Added text to state that in patients aged 60 years and younger, outcomes for those receiving daunorubicin were superior to those receiving more traditional dosing; complete remission rate was 71% versus 57%, and median survival was 24 months versus 16 months (cited Fernandez et al. as reference 7); however, no comparison data for daunorubicin administered at different dosing rates are available.Two studies examined when idarubicin versus daunorubicin were administered to elderly patients and found that overall survival was not impacted by the choice of anthracycline, but the percentage of

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