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Medical Reference Related to Cancer

  1. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  2. Malignant Mesothelioma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Malignant Mesothelioma

    Malignant mesothelioma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lining of the chest or abdomen. Malignant mesothelioma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells are found in the pleura (the thin layer of tissue that lines the chest cavity and covers the lungs) or the peritoneum (the thin layer of tissue that lines the abdomen and covers most of the organs in the abdomen).

  3. Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Patient Information [NCI] - Current Clinical Trials

    Check NCI's list of cancer clinical trials for cancer CAM clinical trials on marijuana, nabilone, dronabinol and nabiximols that are actively enrolling patients. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

  4. Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Treatment of inflammatory breast cancer may include the following:Chemotherapy.Chemotherapy followed by surgery (breast-conserving surgery or total mastectomy), with lymph node dissection followed by radiation therapy. Additional therapy (chemotherapy, hormone therapy, or both) may be given.Clinical trials testing new anticancer drugs, new drug combinations, and new ways of giving treatment.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with inflammatory breast cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

  5. Vaginal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options by Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia (VAIN)Treatment of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) 1 is usually watchful waiting.Treatment of VAIN 2 and 3 may include the following:Watchful waiting.Laser surgery.Wide local excision, with or without a skin graft.Partial or total vaginectomy, with or without a skin graft.Topical chemotherapy.Internal radiation therapy.A clinical trial of a new topical chemotherapy drug.Stage I Vaginal CancerTreatment of stage I squamous cell vaginal cancer may include the following:Internal radiation therapy.External radiation therapy, especially for large tumors or the lymph nodes near tumors in the lower part of the vagina.Wide local excision or vaginectomy with vaginal reconstruction. Radiation therapy may be

  6. Melanoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Melanoma

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about melanoma, see the following:Melanoma Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Melanoma and Other Skin CancersSkin Cancer PreventionSkin Cancer ScreeningSentinel Lymph Node BiopsyDrugs Approved for MelanomaBiological Therapies for CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies)Targeted Cancer TherapiesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  7. Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    There is currently no standard therapy for patients with recurrent disease. These patients should be entered into an ongoing clinical trial. Patients who present with uterine sarcoma have been treated on a series of phase II studies by the Gynecologic Oncology Group, including the GOG-87B trial, for example. These chemotherapy studies have documented some antitumor activity for cisplatin, doxorubicin, and ifosfamide. These studies have also documented differences in response leading to separate trials for patients with carcinosarcomas and leiomyosarcomas. As an example, in patients previously untreated with chemotherapy, ifosfamide had a 32.2% response rate in patients with carcinosarcomas,[1] a 33% response rate in patients with endometrial stromal cell sarcomas,[2] and a 17.2% partial response rate in patients with leiomyosarcomas.[3] Doxorubicin in combination with dacarbazine or cyclophosphamide is no more active than doxorubicin alone for recurrent disease.[4,5] Cisplatin has

  8. Coenzyme Q10 (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062979-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Coenzyme Q10

  9. Essiac/Flor Essence (PDQ®): Complementary and alternative medicine - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Human / Clinical Studies

    EssiacNo report of a clinical study of Essiac has been published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Brief descriptions of one incomplete clinical study and one retrospective evaluation of Essiac as a treatment for cancer have been published. Reviewed in [1,2,3,4,5,6] It is not clear whether the described patient populations consisted entirely of adults or whether they included children.As noted previously (refer to the History section of this summary for more information), the developer provided a four-herb recipe for Essiac to a Canadian corporation in 1977. Reviewed in [2,6] In 1978, the corporation filed a preclinical new drug submission with the Canadian Department of National Health and Welfare (Health Protection Branch) and was given permission to conduct studies on the safety and the efficacy of Essiac in cancer patients. Reviewed in [2,4,5,6,7,8] In 1982, the Department withdrew its permission after determining the research was not being conducted as planned (refer to

  10. Childhood Astrocytomas Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with childhood astrocytoma.Different types of treatment are available for children with astrocytomas. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Because cancer in children is rare, taking part in a clinical trial should be considered. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Children with astrocytomas should have their treatment planned by a team of health care providers who are experts in treating childhood brain tumors. Treatment will be overseen by a pediatric oncologist, a doctor who specializes in treating children with cancer. The pediatric

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