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Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cancer

  1. Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer

    WebMD helps you understand radiation therapy in the treatment of breast cancer.

  2. 10 Questions to Ask the Radiation Oncologist About Breast Cancer

    WebMD provides questions to ask when visiting the radiation oncologist for breast cancer treatment.

  3. The Birth Control Pill and Breast Cancer Risk

    Learn about birth control pills and their link to breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

  4. Prostate Cancer, Advanced or Metastatic - Questions or Comments About This Summary

    If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

  5. Neuroblastoma Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Stage Information and Treatment of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Childhood Spinal Cord Tumors

    There is no uniformly accepted staging system for childhood primary spinal cord tumors. These tumors are classified and treated based on their location within the spinal cord and histology. Refer to one of the following PDQ summaries for more information on the staging and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent childhood spinal cord tumors:Childhood Astrocytomas Treatment.Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors Treatment.Childhood Ependymoma Treatment.In general, at the time of recurrence, low-grade spinal cord glial tumors can be treated with re-resection with or without the use of radiation therapy. Recurrent low-grade and high-grade tumors that cannot be re-resected can be treated on protocols designed for histologically similar brain tumors.

  6. Cancer Genetics Overview (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    If you have questions or comments about this summary, please send them to through the Web site's Contact Form. We can respond only to email messages written in English.

  7. Cancer Genetics Overview (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about cancer genetics risk assessment and counseling. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Cancer Genetics Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus

  8. Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Distal Urethral Cancer

    Female Distal Urethral CancerIf the malignancy is at or just within the meatus and superficial parameters (stage 0/Tis, Ta), open excision or electroresection and fulguration may be possible. Tumor destruction using Nd:YAG or CO2 laser vaporization-coagulation represents an alternative option. For large lesions and more invasive lesions (stage A and stage B, T1 and T2, respectively), brachytherapy or a combination of brachytherapy and external-beam radiation therapy are alternatives to surgical resection of the distal third of the urethra. Patients with T3 distal urethral lesions, or lesions that recur after treatment with local excision or radiation therapy, require anterior exenteration and urinary diversion. If inguinal nodes are palpable, frozen section confirmation of tumor should be obtained. If positive for malignancy, ipsilateral node dissection is indicated. If no inguinal adenopathy exists, node dissection is not generally performed, and the nodes are followed clinically.

  9. Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Testicular Cancer

    Related Summary Note: A separate PDQ summary on Testicular Cancer Screening is also available. Statistics Note: Estimated new cases and deaths from testicular cancer in the United States in 2010:[ 1 ] New cases: 8,480. Deaths: 350. Note: Some citations in the text of this section are followed by a level of evidence. The PDQ editorial boards use a formal ranking system to help the reader judge ...

  10. Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Histopathologic, Immunologic, and Cytogenetic Characteristics of LCH

    Cell of Origin and Biologic CorrelatesModern classification of the histiocytic diseases divides them into dendritic cell–related, monocyte/macrophage-related, or true malignancies. Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a dendritic cell disease.[1,2] The Langerhans cells (LCH cells) in LCH lesions are immature cells that express the monocyte marker CD14, which is not found on normal skin Langerhans cells (LCs).[3] Comprehensive gene expression array data analysis on LCH cells is consistent with the concept that the skin LC is not the cell of origin for LCH.[4] Rather it is likely to be a myeloid dendritic cell, which expresses the same antigens (CD1a and CD207) as the skin LC. This concept was further supported by a study reporting that the transcription profile of LCH cells was distinct from myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, as well as epidermal LCs.[5]LCH lesions also contain lymphocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, fibroblasts, and sometimes multinucleated

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