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Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cancer

  1. Endometrial Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (06 / 06 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  2. Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062821-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss

  3. Ewing Sarcoma

    Ewing's sarcoma is a rare bone tumor that occurs most often in adolescents. It may also arise outside of the bone in soft tissue (extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma). Ewing's sarcoma is related to another type of tumor known as primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Researchers have learned that both of these tumors arise from the same primitive cell and now refer to these tumors as the Ewing ...

  4. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the diagnostic criteria for and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Supportive and Palliative Care Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to

  5. Penile Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with penile cancer.Different types of treatments are available for patients with penile cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Three types of standard treatment are used:SurgerySurgery is the most common treatment for all stages of penile cancer. A doctor may remove the cancer using one of the following operations: Mohs microsurgery: A procedure in which the tumor is cut from the skin in thin layers. During the surgery, the edges

  6. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview for Adult NHL

    Treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) depends on the histologic type and stage. Many of the improvements in survival have been made using clinical trials (experimental therapy) that have attempted to improve on the best available accepted therapy (conventional or standard therapy). In asymptomatic patients with indolent forms of advanced NHL, treatment may be deferred until the patient becomes symptomatic as the disease progresses. When treatment is deferred, the clinical course of patients with indolent NHL varies; frequent and careful observation is required so that effective treatment can be initiated when the clinical course of the disease accelerates. Some patients have a prolonged indolent course, but others have disease that rapidly evolves into more aggressive types of NHL that require immediate treatment.Radiation techniques differ somewhat from those used in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. The dose of radiation therapy usually varies from 25 Gy to 50 Gy and is

  7. About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  8. Endometrial Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Who is at Risk?

    Endometrial cancer is a disease that primarily affects postmenopausal women at an average age of 60 years at diagnosis. Risk factors include postmenopausal estrogen therapy,obesity,a high-fat diet,reproductive factors like nulliparity,early menarche and late menopause,polycystic ovarian syndrome,and tamoxifen use. Women with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome have a ...

  9. Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Classic Kaposi sarcoma is found most often in older men of Italian or Eastern European Jewish origin.Classic Kaposi sarcoma is a rare disease that gets worse slowly over many years. Symptoms of classic Kaposi sarcoma may include slow-growing lesions on the legs and feet.Patients may have one or more red, purple, or brown skin lesions on the legs and feet, most often on the ankles or soles of the feet. Over time, lesions may form in other parts of the body, such as the stomach, intestines, or lymph nodes. The lesions usually don't cause any symptoms, but may grow in size and number over a period of 10 years or more. Pressure from the lesions may block the flow of lymph and blood in the legs and cause painful swelling. Lesions in the digestive tract may cause gastrointestinal bleeding.Another cancer may develop. Some patients with classic Kaposi sarcoma may develop another type of cancer before the Kaposi sarcoma lesions appear or later in life. Most often, this second cancer is

  10. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    DysgerminomasStandard treatment options:Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymphangiography or computed tomography (CT).Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by observation.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with adjuvant radiation therapy or chemotherapy.For patients with stage I dysgerminoma, unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy conserving the uterus and opposite ovary is accepted treatment of the younger patient who wants to preserve fertility or a pregnancy. Postoperative lymphangiography or CT is indicated before treatment decisions are made for patients who have not had careful surgical and pathological examination of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes during surgery. (Refer to the PDQ summary on Sexuality and Reproductive Issues for more information on fertility.)Patients who have been completely staged and have stage IA tumors may be observed carefully after surgery without adjuvant treatment. About 15% to 25% of these patients will relapse, but they can be treated

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