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Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cancer

  1. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma

    Standard treatment options:For resectable primary disease: Radical surgical resection. For unresectable primary disease:Surgical bypass of obstructing lesion and radiation therapy.For unresectable metastatic disease:Palliative surgery.Palliative radiation therapy.Palliative chemotherapy.Treatment options under clinical evaluation: For unresectable primary or metastatic disease: Clinical trials evaluating the value of new anticancer drugs and biologicals.Current Clinical TrialsCheck for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with small intestine leiomyosarcoma. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

  2. Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss (PDQ®): Supportive care - Patient Information [NCI] - Bereavement and Grief

    Bereavement is the period of sadness after losing a loved one through death. Grief and mourning occur during the period of bereavement. Grief and mourning are closely related. Mourning is the way we show grief in public. The way people mourn is affected by beliefs, religious practices, and cultural customs. People who are grieving are sometimes described as bereaved.Grief is the normal process of reacting to the loss.Grief is the emotional response to the loss of a loved one. Common grief reactions include the following: Feeling emotionally numb.Feeling unable to believe the loss occurred.Feeling anxiety from the distress of being separated from the loved one.Mourning along with depression.A feeling of acceptance.

  3. Pediatric Supportive Care (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  4. Mycosis Fungoides and the Sézary Syndrome Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage Information for Mycosis Fungoides and the Sézary Syndrome

    The stages that follow are defined by TNM classification. Peripheral blood involvement with mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome (MF/SS) cells is correlated with more advanced skin stage, lymph node and visceral involvement, and shortened survival but probably provides no independent prognostic information beyond that associated with TNM staging. In a multivariate analysis, the two most important prognostic factors are the presence of visceral disease and type of skin involvement. MF/SS have a formal staging system proposed by the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas (ISCL) and the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC).[1]Definitions of TNMThe American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has designated staging by TNM classification to define MF.[2]Table 1. ISCL/EORTC Revision to the Classification of Mycosis Fungoides and the Sézary SyndromeaSkinEORTC = European Organization of Research and

  5. Uterine Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  6. Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Recurrent small cell lung cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the chest, central nervous system, or in other parts of the body.

  7. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Orofacial Pain in Cancer Patients

    Pain in cancer patients may arise from onset of the disease through survivorship and may be:[1]Caused by the malignant disease.Caused by acute or chronic complications of cancer therapy.Coincidental and unrelated to the cancer. Cancer pain causes increased morbidity, reduced performance status, increased anxiety and depression, and diminished quality of life (QOL). Dimensions of acute and chronic pain include the following:SensoryPhysiologicAffectiveCognitiveBehavioralSocioculturalManagement of head and neck pain and oral pain may be particularly challenging because eating, speech, swallowing, and other motor functions of the head and neck and oropharynx are constant pain triggers.Orofacial Pain due to CancerAcute and chronic pain in cancer can result from several factors, including the following:Pain due to malignant disease:Local/regional cancer.Oral involvement in systemic/hematopoietic cancer.Metastatic disease.Pain due to treatment:Surgery.Radiation.Chemotherapy.Pain

  8. Nasopharyngeal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about nasopharyngeal cancer, see the following: Head and Neck Cancer Home PageThroat (Laryngeal and Pharyngeal) Cancer Home PageOral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck RadiationDrugs Approved for Head and Neck CancerHead and Neck CancersFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  9. Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Head / Neck Radiation Patients

    Head and neck radiation patients are a significant challenge relative to both intratherapy and posttherapy oral complications resulting from radiation therapy. Unlike the oral complications of chemotherapy that are of shorter duration and significant for only a short period (a few weeks to 2 months) after the cessation of therapy, the oral complications of head and neck radiation are more predictable, are often more severe, and can lead to permanent tissue changes that put the patient at risk for serious chronic complications.Preradiation Dental Evaluation and Oral Disease StabilizationElimination of oral disease and implementation of oral care protocols designed to maintain maximum oral health must be components of patient assessment and care before radiation therapy begins. During and after radiation therapy, oral management will be dictated by the following:Specific needs of the patient.Specifics of the radiation therapy.Chronic complications caused by radiation therapy.Ongoing

  10. Placental-Site Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor Treatment

    Given the rarity of this tumor, reports of therapeutic results are confined to relatively small case series with accrual extending for very long time periods. Therefore, few reliable comparisons among surgical approaches or chemotherapeutic regimens can be made. Nevertheless, there are distinctions in underlying biology between placental-site gestational trophoblastic tumors (PSTTs) and the other gestational trophoblastic tumors—particularly resistance to chemotherapy—that justify specific treatment strategies, such as the following: Tumors confined to the uterus (Féderation Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique [FIGO] Stage I).Hysterectomy is the treatment of choice.[1,2] In a relatively large, retrospective, population-based, consecutive, case series of 62 women with PSTT, 33 had disease confined to the uterus and were treated with hysterectomy (n = 17) or with hysterectomy plus chemotherapy (n = 16). Overall survival at 10 years was virtually identical between the

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