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Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Cancer

  1. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Learn the causes, symptoms, and treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a blood cancer.

  2. Carcinoid Syndrome

    WebMD explains carcinoid syndrome, a group of symptoms you might get if you already have carcinoid tumors, a type of cancer.

  3. Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Non-small-cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer. It's serious, but treatment can sometimes cure it or stop it from getting worse.

  4. B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia makes your child more likely to get sick because it affects the immune system. Find out about the causes, symptoms, and treatment.

  5. Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    WebMD explains the causes, symptoms, and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, a cancer that begins in your liver.

  6. Ewing Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Ewing Sarcoma: Localized Tumors

    Standard Treatment OptionsBecause most patients with apparently localized disease at diagnosis have occult metastatic disease, multidrug chemotherapy as well as local disease control with surgery and/or radiation is indicated in the treatment of all patients.[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8] Current regimens for the treatment of localized Ewing sarcoma achieve event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of approximately 70% at 5 years after diagnosis.[9]Current standard chemotherapy in the United States includes vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, also known as VAdriaC or VDC, alternating with ifosfamide and etoposide (IE).[9] The combination of IE has shown activity in Ewing sarcoma, and a large randomized clinical trial and a nonrandomized trial demonstrated that outcome was improved when IE was alternated with VAdriaC.[2,9,10] Dactinomycin is no longer used in the United States but continues to be used in the Euro-Ewing studies. Increased dose intensity of doxorubicin during

  7. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    Avoiding risk factors and increasing protective factors may help prevent cancer.Avoiding cancer risk factors may help prevent certain cancers. Risk factors include smoking, being overweight, and not getting enough exercise. Increasing protective factors such as quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet, and exercising may also help prevent some cancers. Talk to your doctor or other health care professional about how you might lower your risk of cancer.The following risk factors increase the risk of cervical cancer:HPV InfectionThe most common cause of cervical cancer is infection of the cervix with human papillomavirus (HPV). There are more than 80 types of human papillomavirus. About 30 types can infect the cervix and about half of them have been linked to cervical cancer. HPV infection is common but only a very small number of women infected with HPV develop cervical cancer.HPV infections that cause cervical cancer are spread mainly through sexual contact. Women who become sexually

  8. Vulvar Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Vulvar Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about vulvar cancer, see the following:Vulvar Cancer Home PageLasers in Cancer TreatmentDrugs Approved to Treat Vulvar CancerHuman Papillomaviruses and CancerFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  9. Parathyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with parathyroid cancer. Different types of treatment are available for patients with parathyroid cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Treatment includes control of hypercalcemia (too much calcium in the blood) in patients who have an overactive parathyroid gland. In order to reduce the amount of parathyroid hormone that is being made and control the level of calcium in the blood, as much of the tumor as possible is removed in

  10. Changes to This Summary (07 / 24 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above. Editorial changes were made to this summary.

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