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Cancer Health Center

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J&J Pulls Hysterectomy Tool Tied to Cancer Risk

Controversial device had been used for minimally invasive hysterectomies, uterine fibroid removal

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, July 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The largest maker of a surgical tool that has shown an increased risk of spreading undetected cancers in women has said it will withdraw its device from the market.

In a letter that was to be sent to all of its customers Thursday, Johnson & Johnson asked that its laparoscopic power morcellators be returned to the company, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Sales of new morcellators had been suspended in April after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned that doctors should not use the tool because of the potential risk of spreading cancer during minimally invasive surgeries to remove uterine fibroids, noncancerous growths on the uterus, or the uterus itself.

The morcellator used a spinning power cutter to slice uterine tissue into smaller fragments. Those fragments were then removed through small incisions in the abdomen via a tube or laparoscope.

Experts said the company's decision sends a strong message.

"The bottom line is that it looks like the [cancer] risk is much higher than we originally thought," Dr. Steven McCarus, chief of gynecological surgery at Florida Hospital Celebration Health, which was one of the chief Johnson & Johnson training sites for the morcellator device, told the WSJ. The hospital suspended its use of power morcellators after the April FDA advisory, the newspaper reported.

McCarus added that he had been part of a committee the company formed to review existing research on the increased cancer risk, and that he had advised the company that the risk was too high.

Another doctor told the WSJ that the company's decision indicates that it agrees the risk is too significant to ignore.

"What it says to me is that they are rightfully so concerned with ramifications of spreading cancer that they just don't want any part of this market," James Barter, director of gynecologic oncology research at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, Md., told the newspaper. "The message is very, very sound, very clear. The message is that it's just not worth it."

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