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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  1. Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    A look at the causes, symptoms, and treatment of mantle cell lymphoma, a cancer that affects white blood cells known as lymphocytes.

  2. Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    WebMD explains the causes, symptoms, and treatment of small lymphocytic lymphoma, a cancer that affects a type of white blood cell called a "lymphocyte," which helps your body fight infection.

  3. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Learn about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, a blood cancer.

  4. Follicular Lymphoma

    Find out about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of follicular lymphoma, a type of cancer.

  5. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHL

    Although localized presentations are uncommon in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the goal of treatment should be to cure the disease in patients who are shown to have truly localized occurrence after undergoing appropriate staging procedures.Standard Treatment Options for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHLStandard treatment options for indolent, stage I and contiguous stage II adult NHL include the following:Radiation therapy.Rituximab with or without chemotherapy.Watchful waiting.Other therapies as designated for patients with advanced-stage disease.The National Lymphocare Study identified 471 patients with stage I follicular lymphoma. Of those patients, 206 were rigorously staged with a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy, and computed tomography (CT) scans or positive-emission tomography (PET-CT) scans.[1] Nonrandomized treatments included radiation therapy (27%), rituximab-chemotherapy (R-chemotherapy) (28%), watchful waiting (17%), R-chemotherapy plus radiation therapy

  6. Stage Information for Adult NHL

    Stage is important in selecting a treatment for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans are usually part of the staging evaluation for all lymphoma patients. The staging system is similar to the staging system used for Hodgkin lymphoma.Common among patients with NHL is involvement of the following:Noncontiguous lymph nodes.Waldeyer ring.Epitrochlear nodes.Gastrointestinal tract.Extranodal presentations. (A single extranodal site is occasionally the only site of involvement in patients with diffuse lymphoma.)Bone marrow.Liver (especially common in patients with low-grade lymphomas).Cytologic examination of cerebrospinal fluid may be positive in patients with aggressive NHL. Involvement of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes is less common than in Hodgkin lymphoma. Mediastinal adenopathy, however, is a prominent feature of lymphoblastic lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, entities primarily found in young

  7. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Basic information about childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma

  8. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 08 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Changes were made to this summary to match those made to the health professional version.

  9. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Recurrent childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. Childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma may come back in the lymph system or in other parts of the body.

  10. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - High-Stage Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma Treatment

    Patients with high-stage (stage III or IV) lymphoblastic lymphoma have long-term survival rates higher than 80%.[1] Unlike other pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), it has been shown that lymphoblastic lymphoma responds much better to leukemia therapy with 2 years of therapy than with shorter, intensive, pulsed chemotherapy regimens.[1,2,3]Involvement of the bone marrow may lead to confusion as to whether the patient has lymphoma or leukemia. Traditionally, patients with more than 25% marrow blasts are classified as having leukemia, and those with fewer than 25% marrow blasts are classified as having lymphoma. It is not yet clear whether these arbitrary definitions are biologically distinct or relevant for treatment design. All current therapies for advanced-stage lymphoblastic lymphoma have been derived from regimens designed for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Mediastinal radiation is not necessary for patients with mediastinal masses, except in the emergency

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