Skip to content

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  1. Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Different types of treatment are available for patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment),and some are being tested in clinical trials. Before starting treatment,patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. A treatment clinical trial i

  2. Get More Information From NCI

    Sources of further information about Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment.

  3. High-Stage Childhood B-cell NHL Treatment

    Patients with high-stage (stage III or stage IV) mature B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (Burkitt or Burkitt-like lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) have an 80% to 90% long-term survival.[1,2,3] Unlike mature B-lineage NHL seen in adults, there is no difference in outcome based on histology (Burkitt or Burkitt-like lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) with current therapy in pediatric trials.[1,2,3]Involvement of the bone marrow may lead to confusion as to whether the patient has lymphoma or leukemia. Traditionally, patients with more than 25% marrow blasts are classified as having mature B-cell leukemia, and those with fewer than 25% marrow blasts are classified as having lymphoma. It is not clear whether these arbitrary definitions are biologically distinct, but there is no question that patients with Burkitt leukemia should be treated with protocols designed for Burkitt lymphoma.[1,3]Tumor lysis syndrome is often present at diagnosis or after initiation of

  4. Treatment for Indolent, Recurrent Adult NHL

    In general, treatment with standard agents rarely produces a cure in patients whose disease has relapsed. Sustained remissions after relapse can often be obtained in patients with indolent lymphomas, but relapse will usually ensue. Favorable survival after relapse has been associated with an age younger than 60 years, complete remission rather than partial remission, and duration of response longer than 1 year. Even the most favorable subset, however, has a tenfold greater mortality compared with age-adjusted U.S. population rates.[1] Patients who experience a relapse with indolent lymphoma can often have their disease controlled with single agent or combination chemotherapy, rituximab (an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody), lenalidomide, radiolabeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, or palliative radiation therapy.[2,3] Long-term freedom from second relapse, however, is uncommon and multiple relapses will usually occur. Patients with indolent lymphoma may experience a relapse with a

  5. Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for children with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Different types of treatment are available for children with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment),and some are being tested in clinical trials. Before starting treatment,patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. A treatment clinical trial i

  6. Treatment for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHL

    Although localized presentations are uncommon in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the goal of treatment should be to cure the disease in patients who are shown to have truly localized occurrence after undergoing appropriate staging procedures.Standard Treatment Options for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHLStandard treatment options for indolent, stage I and contiguous stage II adult NHL include the following:Radiation therapy.Rituximab with or without chemotherapy.Watchful waiting.Other therapies as designated for patients with advanced-stage disease.Radiation therapy Long-term disease control within radiation fields can be achieved in a significant number of patients with indolent stage I or stage II NHL by using dosages of radiation that usually range from 25 Gy to 40 Gy to involved sites or to extended fields that cover adjacent nodal sites.[1,2,3,4] Almost half of all patients treated with radiation therapy alone will relapse out-of-field within 10 years.[5]Rituximab

  7. Late Effects of Treatment for Adult NHL

    Late effects of treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have been observed. Pelvic radiation therapy and large cumulative doses of cyclophosphamide have been associated with a high risk of permanent sterility.[1] For as many as three decades after diagnosis, patients are at a significantly elevated risk for second primary cancers, especially the following:[1,2,3]Lung cancer.Brain cancer.Kidney cancer.Bladder cancer.Melanoma.Hodgkin lymphoma.Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.Left ventricular dysfunction was a significant late effect in long-term survivors of high-grade NHL who received more than 200 mg/m² of doxorubicin.[4,5]Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia are late complications of myeloablative therapy with autologous bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell support, as well as conventional chemotherapy-containing alkylating agents.[1,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13] Most of these patients show clonal hematopoiesis even before the transplantation, suggesting that the

  8. Treatment for Aggressive, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHL

    Patients with stage I or contiguous stage II diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are candidates for combination chemotherapy with or without involved-field radiation therapy (IF-XRT).The following drug combinations are referred to in this section:R-CHOP: rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, + cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisone.Standard Treatment Options for Aggressive, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHLStandard treatment options for aggressive, stage I and contiguous stage II adult NHL include the following:R-CHOP with or without IF-XRT.R-CHOP with or without IF-XRTFour prospective randomized trials have evaluated the comparison of CHOP or more intensive CHOP-based chemotherapy alone versus combined–modality therapy with CHOP and IF-XRT.[1,2,3,4,5]Evidence (CHOP vs. CHOP with IF-XRT): In a randomized trial with 7 years' median follow-up, 576 patients older than 60 years with early-stage disease received four cycles of CHOP with or without IF-XRT;

  9. Aggressive NHL

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) includes the following subtypes:Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma).Follicular large cell lymphoma.Anaplastic large cell lymphoma.Extranodal NK-/T-cell lymphoma.Lymphomatoid granulomatosis.Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.Peripheral T-cell lymphoma.Enteropathy-type intestinal T-cell lymphoma.Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (intravascular lymphomatosis).Burkitt lymphoma/diffuse small noncleaved-cell lymphoma.Lymphoblastic lymphoma.Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.Mantle cell lymphoma.Polymorphic posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder.True histiocytic lymphoma.Primary effusion lymphoma.Diffuse Large B-cell LymphomaDiffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common of the NHLs and comprises 30% of newly diagnosed cases.[1] Most patients present with rapidly enlarging masses, often with both local and systemic symptoms

  10. Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated.

Displaying 91 - 100 of 118 Articles << Prev Page 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Next >>

Today on WebMD

stem cells
What are they and why do we need them?
Lung cancer xray
See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
 
sauteed cherry tomatoes
Fight cancer one plate at a time.
Ovarian cancer illustration
Do you know the symptoms?
 
Vitamin D
SLIDESHOW
New Treatments For Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma
FEATURE
 
Lifestyle Tips for Depression Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
Pets Improve Your Health
SLIDESHOW
 

WebMD Special Sections