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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  1. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

    The NHLs are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative malignancies with differing patterns of behavior and responses to treatment.[1]Like Hodgkin lymphoma, NHL usually originates in lymphoid tissues and can spread to other organs. NHL, however, is much less predictable than Hodgkin lymphoma and has a far greater predilection to disseminate to extranodal sites. The prognosis depends on the histologic type, stage, and treatment.Incidence and MortalityEstimated new cases and deaths from NHL in the United States in 2013:[2]New cases: 69,740.Deaths: 19,020.AnatomyNHL usually originates in lymphoid tissues.Anatomy of the lymph system.Prognosis and SurvivalThe NHLs can be divided into two prognostic groups: the indolent lymphomas and the aggressive lymphomas. Indolent NHL types have a relatively good prognosis with a median survival as long as 10 to 20 years, but they usually are not curable in advanced clinical stages. Early-stage (stage I and stage II) indolent NHL can be effectively

  2. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for children with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Different types of treatment are available for children with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment),and some are being tested in clinical trials. Before starting treatment,patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. A treatment clinical trial i

  3. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated.

  4. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000258002-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment

  5. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - High-Stage Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Treatment

    Children and adolescents with high-stage (stage III or IV) anaplastic large cell lymphoma have a disease-free survival of approximately 60% to 75%.[1,2,3,4,5,6] It is unclear which strategy is best for the treatment of high-stage anaplastic large cell lymphoma. The German Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) group used six cycles of intensive pulsed therapy, similar to their B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) therapy (GER-GPOH-NHL-BFM-90 [NHL-BFM-90]).[2]; [7][Level of evidence: 1iiA] Building on these results, the European Intergroup for Childhood NHL (EICNHL) group conducted the FRE-IGR-ALCL99 study (based on the GER-GPOH-NHL-BFM-90 regimen). First, this randomized study demonstrated that methotrexate 1 g/m2 infused over 24 hours plus intrathecal methotrexate and methotrexate 3 g/m2 infused over 3 hours without intrathecal methotrexate yielded similar outcomes.[8][Level of evidence: 1iiC] However, methotrexate 3 g/m2 over 3 hours had less toxicity than methotrexate 1 g/m2 over 24

  6. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Indolent NHL

    Indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) includes the following subtypes:Follicular lymphoma.Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (Waldenström macroglobulinemia).Marginal zone lymphoma.Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.Follicular LymphomaFollicular lymphoma comprises 20% of all NHLs and as many as 70% of the indolent lymphomas reported in American and European clinical trials.[1,2,3] Most patients with follicular lymphoma are age 50 years and older and present with widespread disease at diagnosis. Nodal involvement is most common and is often accompanied by splenic and bone marrow disease. Rearrangement of the bcl-2 gene is present in more than 90% of patients with follicular lymphoma; overexpression of the bcl-2 protein is associated with the inability to eradicate the lymphoma by inhibiting apoptosis.[4]PrognosisDespite the advanced stage, the median survival ranges from 8 to 15 years, leading to the

  7. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062808-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment

  8. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

    Fortunately, cancer in children and adolescents is rare, although the overall incidence of childhood cancer has been slowly increasing since 1975.[1] Children and adolescents with cancer should be referred to medical centers that have a multidisciplinary team of cancer specialists with experience treating the cancers that occur during childhood and adolescence. This multidisciplinary team approach incorporates the skills of the primary care physician, pediatric surgical subspecialists, radiation oncologists, pediatric medical oncologists/hematologists, rehabilitation specialists, pediatric nurse specialists, social workers, and others to ensure that children receive treatment, supportive care, and rehabilitation that will achieve optimal survival and quality of life. (Refer to the PDQ Supportive and Palliative Care summaries for specific information about supportive care for children and adolescents with cancer.)Guidelines for pediatric cancer centers and

  9. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Low-Stage Childhood NHL Treatment

    Patients with stage I and II disease have an excellent prognosis, regardless of histology. A Children's Cancer Group study demonstrated that pulsed chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, and prednisone (COMP) administered for 6 months for low-stage (stage I or II) nonlymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was equivalent to 18 months of therapy with radiation to sites of disease, resulting in more than 85% disease-free survival (DFS) and more than 90% overall survival (OS). However, patients with lymphoblastic lymphoma had a much inferior outcome.[1,2] A Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) study tested 9 weeks of short, pulsed chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), with or without radiation to involved sites and with or without 24 weeks of maintenance chemotherapy.[3] The results showed no benefit of radiation or maintenance chemotherapy, but the DFS for nonlymphoblastic lymphoma was superior to that of

  10. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (04 / 04 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Cellular Classification of Childhood NHLAdded Godot et al. as reference 42 and Louissaint et al. as reference 48.Revised text to state that mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas observed in pediatric patients usually present as low-stage disease, and pediatric gastric MALT lymphomas are associated with Helicobacter pylori and require no more than local therapy involving curative surgery and/or radiation therapy. Also added text to state that conjunctival MALT lymphomas are often associated with chlamydial psittaci infections (cited Stefanovic et al. as reference 54).Added text to state that an oral retinoid (bexarotene) has been reported to be active against subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphomas and cutaneous gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas in a series of 15 patients from

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