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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  1. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma, see the following: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Non-Hodgkin LymphomaDrugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin LymphomaTargeted Cancer TherapiesUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies and Targeted Therapies for Lymphoma)Biological Therapies for Cancer: Questions and AnswersFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  2. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHL

    Although localized presentations are uncommon in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the goal of treatment should be to cure the disease in patients who are shown to have truly localized occurrence after undergoing appropriate staging procedures.Standard Treatment Options for Indolent, Stage I and Contiguous Stage II Adult NHLStandard treatment options for indolent, stage I and contiguous stage II adult NHL include the following:Radiation therapy.Rituximab with or without chemotherapy.Watchful waiting.Other therapies as designated for patients with advanced-stage disease.The National Lymphocare Study identified 471 patients with stage I follicular lymphoma. Of those patients, 206 were rigorously staged with a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy, and computed tomography (CT) scans or positive-emission tomography (PET-CT) scans.[1] Nonrandomized treatments included radiation therapy (27%), rituximab-chemotherapy (R-chemotherapy) (28%), watchful waiting (17%), R-chemotherapy plus radiation therapy

  3. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  4. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your child's doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for your child.Low-stage Childhood Non-Hodgkin LymphomaTreatment of low-stage (stage I or II) non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents may include the following:Surgery followed by combination chemotherapy.Surgery and/or radiation therapy for anaplastic large cell lymphoma that affects the skin.A clinical trial of a new treatment.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I childhood large cell lymphoma, stage I childhood small noncleaved cell lymphoma, stage I childhood lymphoblastic lymphoma, stage I childhood anaplastic large cell lymphoma, stage II childhood large cell lymphoma, stage II childhood small noncleaved cell lymphoma, stage II childhood

  5. Aggressive NHL

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) includes the following subtypes:Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma).Follicular large cell lymphoma.Anaplastic large cell lymphoma.Extranodal NK-/T-cell lymphoma.Lymphomatoid granulomatosis.Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.Peripheral T-cell lymphoma.Enteropathy-type intestinal T-cell lymphoma.Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (intravascular lymphomatosis).Burkitt lymphoma/diffuse small noncleaved-cell lymphoma.Lymphoblastic lymphoma.Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.Mantle cell lymphoma.Polymorphic posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder.True histiocytic lymphoma.Primary effusion lymphoma.Diffuse Large B-cell LymphomaDiffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common of the NHLs and comprises 30% of newly diagnosed cases.[1] Most patients present with rapidly enlarging masses, often with both local and systemic

  6. Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The lymphoma may come back in the lymph system or in other parts of the body. Indolent lymphoma may come back as aggressive lymphoma. Aggressive lymphoma may come back as indolent lymphoma.

  7. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (08 / 09 / 2013)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Cellular Classification of Childhood NHLAdded text to state that in a study of adolescents with stage III primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma treated with FAB/LMB-96 therapy, the 5-year event-free survival (EFS) was 66%, versus 85% for adolescents with nonmediastinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (cited Gerrard et al. as reference 24 and level of evidence 2A). Also added text about a single-arm study in adults that showed excellent disease-free survival utilizing the DA-EPOCH-R regimen (dose-adjusted etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab; usually six cycles) with filgrastim and no radiation therapy. The 5-year EFS was 93% and overall survival (OS) was 97% (cited Dunleavy et al. as reference 25 and level of evidence 2A).Revised text to state that

  8. Late Effects of Treatment for Adult NHL

    Late effects of treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have been observed. Pelvic radiation therapy and large cumulative doses of cyclophosphamide have been associated with a high risk of permanent sterility.[1] For as many as three decades after diagnosis, patients are at a significantly elevated risk for second primary cancers, especially the following:[1,2,3]Lung cancer.Brain cancer.Kidney cancer.Bladder cancer.Melanoma.Hodgkin lymphoma.Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.Left ventricular dysfunction was a significant late effect in long-term survivors of high-grade NHL who received more than 200 mg/m² of doxorubicin.[4,5]Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia are late complications of myeloablative therapy with autologous bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell support, as well as conventional chemotherapy-containing alkylating agents.[1,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13] Most of these patients show clonal hematopoiesis even before the transplantation, suggesting that the

  9. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ Non-Hodgkin LymphomaComputed Tomography (CT) Scans and CancerDrugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin LymphomaBone Marrow Transplantation and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell TransplantationTargeted Cancer TherapiesUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies and Targeted Therapies for Lymphoma)Understanding Cancer Series: The Immune SystemFor more childhood cancer information and other general cancer resources, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerChildhood CancersCureSearch for Children's CancerLate Effects of Treatment for Childhood CancerAdolescents and Young Adults with CancerYoung People with Cancer: A Handbook for ParentsCare for Children and Adolescents with CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About

  10. Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent Childhood NHL Treatment

    Outcome for recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in children and adolescents depends on histologic subtype. A Children's Cancer Group study (CCG-5912) was able to achieve complete remission (CR) in 40% of NHL patients.[1] A Pediatric Oncology Group study showed a 70% response rate and 40% CR rate.[2] Radiation therapy may have a role in treating patients who have not had a complete response to chemotherapy. All patients with primary refractory or relapsed NHL should be considered for clinical trials. For recurrent or refractory B-lineage NHL, survival is generally 10% to 20%.[3,4,5,6,7] Chemoresistance is a major problem, making remission difficult to achieve. There is no standard treatment option for patients with recurrent or progressive disease. The use of single-agent rituximab, and rituximab combined with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy, has shown activity in the treatment of B-cell lymphoma patients.[8][Level of evidence: 3iiiDii] A Children's Oncology Group (COG) study

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