Skip to content

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  1. Understanding Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma -- Diagnosis & Treatment

    Learn more about the diagnosis and treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma from the experts at WebMD.

  2. Understanding Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma -- Symptoms

    Information on the symptoms of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  3. Radiation Therapy for Lymphoma and Leukemia

    Radiation therapy is the use of high - dose X - rays to treat cancer cells that may remain after surgery, especially if all of the cancer cannot be removed. Radiation therapy is often used for the treatment of cancer, such as non - Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin's lymphoma, and all types of leukemias. Radiation therapy may be used alone or in combination with other treatment options, such as ..

  4. Watchful Waiting (Surveillance) for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Watchful waiting (surveillance) is a period in the treatment of non - Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in which little or no treatment is done. It does not mean that your health professionals are giving up or refusing to give you treatment. ...

  5. High-Stage Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma Treatment

    Patients with high-stage (stage III or IV) lymphoblastic lymphoma have long-term survival rates higher than 80%.[1] Unlike other pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), it has been shown that lymphoblastic lymphoma responds much better to leukemia therapy with 2 years of therapy than with shorter, intensive, pulsed chemotherapy regimens.[1,2,3]Involvement of the bone marrow may lead to confusion as to whether the patient has lymphoma or leukemia. Traditionally, patients with more than 25% marrow blasts are classified as having leukemia, and those with fewer than 25% marrow blasts are classified as having lymphoma. It is not yet clear whether these arbitrary definitions are biologically distinct or relevant for treatment design. All current therapies for advanced-stage lymphoblastic lymphoma have been derived from regimens designed for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Mediastinal radiation is not necessary for patients with mediastinal masses, except in the emergency

  6. Treatment for Aggressive, Noncontiguous Stage II / III / IV Adult NHL

    The treatment of choice for patients with advanced stages of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is combination chemotherapy, either alone or supplemented by local-field radiation therapy.[1]The following drug combinations are referred to in this section:ACVBP: doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vindesine + bleomycin + prednisone.CHOP: cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisone.CNOP: cyclophosphamide + mitoxantrone + vincristine + prednisone.m-BACOD: methotrexate + bleomycin + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vincristine + dexamethasone + leucovorin.MACOP-B: methotrexate + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + vincristine + prednisone fixed dose + bleomycin + leucovorin.ProMACE CytaBOM: prednisone + doxorubicin + cyclophosphamide + etoposide + cytarabine + bleomycin + vincristine + methotrexate + leucovorin.R-CHOP: rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, + cyclophosphamide + doxorubicin + vincristine + prednisone.Standard Treatment Options for

  7. Aggressive NHL

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) includes the following subtypes:Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.Mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma).Follicular large cell lymphoma.Anaplastic large cell lymphoma.Extranodal NK-/T-cell lymphoma.Lymphomatoid granulomatosis.Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma.Peripheral T-cell lymphoma.Enteropathy-type intestinal T-cell lymphoma.Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (intravascular lymphomatosis).Burkitt lymphoma/diffuse small noncleaved-cell lymphoma.Lymphoblastic lymphoma.Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.Mantle cell lymphoma.Polymorphic posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder.True histiocytic lymphoma.Primary effusion lymphoma.Diffuse Large B-cell LymphomaDiffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common of the NHLs and comprises 30% of newly diagnosed cases.[1] Most patients present with rapidly enlarging masses, often with both local and systemic symptoms

  8. Indolent NHL

    Indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) includes the following subtypes:Follicular lymphoma.Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (Waldenström macroglobulinemia).Marginal zone lymphoma.Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.Follicular LymphomaFollicular lymphoma comprises 20% of all NHLs and as many as 70% of the indolent lymphomas reported in American and European clinical trials.[1,2,3] Most patients with follicular lymphoma are age 50 years and older and present with widespread disease at diagnosis. Nodal involvement is most common and is often accompanied by splenic and bone marrow disease. Rearrangement of the bcl-2 gene is present in more than 90% of patients with follicular lymphoma; overexpression of the bcl-2 protein is associated with the inability to eradicate the lymphoma by inhibiting apoptosis.[4]PrognosisDespite the advanced stage, the median survival ranges from 8 to 15 years, leading to the

  9. Treatment Options for Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Localized non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents

  10. Treatment for Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma is a very aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), which often occurs in young patients, but not exclusively. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is commonly associated with large mediastinal masses and has a high predilection for disseminating to bone marrow and the central nervous system (CNS). The treatment paradigms are based on trials for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) since lymphoblastic lymphoma and ALL are considered different manifestations of the same biologic disease. (Refer to the PDQ summary on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment for more information.) Treatment is usually patterned after ALL. Intensive combination chemotherapy with CNS prophylaxis is the standard treatment of this aggressive histologic type of NHL. Radiation therapy is sometimes given to areas of bulky tumor masses. Since these forms of NHL tend to progress quickly, combination chemotherapy is instituted rapidly once the diagnosis has been confirmed.The most important aspects

Displaying 61 - 70 of 118 Articles << Prev Page 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Next >>

Today on WebMD

stem cells
What are they and why do we need them?
Lung cancer xray
See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
 
sauteed cherry tomatoes
Fight cancer one plate at a time.
Ovarian cancer illustration
Do you know the symptoms?
 
Vitamin D
SLIDESHOW
New Treatments For Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma
FEATURE
 
Lifestyle Tips for Depression Slideshow
SLIDESHOW
Pets Improve Your Health
SLIDESHOW
 

WebMD Special Sections