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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Medical Reference Related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  1. Indolent NHL

    Indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) includes the following subtypes:Follicular lymphoma.Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (Waldenström macroglobulinemia).Marginal zone lymphoma.Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma.Follicular LymphomaFollicular lymphoma comprises 20% of all NHLs and as many as 70% of the indolent lymphomas reported in American and European clinical trials.[1,2,3] Most patients with follicular lymphoma are age 50 years and older and present with widespread disease at diagnosis. Nodal involvement is most common and is often accompanied by splenic and bone marrow disease. Rearrangement of the bcl-2 gene is present in more than 90% of patients with follicular lymphoma; overexpression of the bcl-2 protein is associated with the inability to eradicate the lymphoma by inhibiting apoptosis.[4]PrognosisDespite the advanced stage, the median survival ranges from 8 to 15 years, leading to the

  2. About PDQ

    PDQ IS A COMPREHENSIVE CANCER DATABASE AVAILABLE ON NCI'S WEB SITE. PDQ is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. Most of the information contained in PDQ is available online at NCI's Web site. PDQ is provided as a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health,the federal government's focal point for biomedical research. .

  3. Stage Information for Childhood NHL

    The most widely used staging scheme for childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is that of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (Murphy Staging).[1]Stage I Childhood NHLIn stage I childhood NHL, a single tumor or nodal area is involved, excluding the abdomen and mediastinum. Stage II Childhood NHLIn stage II childhood NHL, disease extent is limited to a single tumor with regional node involvement, two or more tumors or nodal areas involved on one side of the diaphragm, or a primary gastrointestinal tract tumor (completely resected) with or without regional node involvement. Stage III Childhood NHLIn stage III childhood NHL, tumors or involved lymph node areas occur on both sides of the diaphragm. Stage III NHL also includes any primary intrathoracic (mediastinal, pleural, or thymic) disease, extensive primary intra-abdominal disease, or any paraspinal or epidural tumors. Stage IV Childhood NHLIn stage IV childhood NHL, tumors involve bone marrow and/or central nervous system

  4. Get More Information From NCI

    This PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma treatment.

  5. Stage Information for Adult NHL

    Stage is important in selecting a treatment for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Chest and abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans are usually part of the staging evaluation for all lymphoma patients. The staging system is similar to the staging system used for Hodgkin lymphoma.Common among patients with NHL is involvement of the following:Noncontiguous lymph nodes.Waldeyer ring.Epitrochlear nodes.Gastrointestinal tract.Extranodal presentations. (A single extranodal site is occasionally the only site of involvement in patients with diffuse lymphoma.)Bone marrow.Liver (especially common in patients with low-grade lymphomas).Cytologic examination of cerebrospinal fluid may be positive in patients with aggressive NHL. Involvement of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes is less common than in Hodgkin lymphoma. Mediastinal adenopathy, however, is a prominent feature of lymphoblastic lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, entities primarily found in young

  6. Late Effects of Treatment for Adult NHL

    Late effects of treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have been observed. Pelvic radiation therapy and large cumulative doses of cyclophosphamide have been associated with a high risk of permanent sterility.[1] For as many as three decades after diagnosis, patients are at a significantly elevated risk for second primary cancers, especially the following:[1,2,3]Lung cancer.Brain cancer.Kidney cancer.Bladder cancer.Melanoma.Hodgkin lymphoma.Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.Left ventricular dysfunction was a significant late effect in long-term survivors of high-grade NHL who received more than 200 mg/m² of doxorubicin.[4,5]Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia are late complications of myeloablative therapy with autologous bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell support, as well as conventional chemotherapy-containing alkylating agents.[1,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13] Most of these patients show clonal hematopoiesis even before the transplantation, suggesting that the

  7. Get More Information From NCI

    Sources of further information about Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment.

  8. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During Pregnancy

    Most non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are aggressive, and delay of therapy in pregnant women until after delivery appears to have poor outcomes.

  9. Treatment for Aggressive, Recurrent Adult NHL

    Standard Treatment Options for Aggressive, Recurrent Adult NHLStandard treatment options for aggressive, recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) include the following:Bone marrow or stem cell transplantation.Re-treatment with standard agents.Palliative radiation therapy.Bone marrow or stem cell transplantationBone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice for patients whose lymphoma has relapsed.[1] Preliminary studies indicate that approximately 20% to 40% of patients will have a long-term disease-free status, but the precise percentage depends on patient selection and the specific treatment used. Preparative drug regimens have varied; some investigators also use total-body irradiation. Similar success has been achieved using autologous marrow, with or without marrow purging, and allogeneic marrow.[2,3,4,5,6]Evidence (bone marrow transplantation):In a prospective, randomized study, known as the EORTC-PARMA trial, 215 patients in first or second relapse of aggressive

  10. Treatment for Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma is a very aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), which often occurs in young patients, but not exclusively. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is commonly associated with large mediastinal masses and has a high predilection for disseminating to bone marrow and the central nervous system (CNS). The treatment paradigms are based on trials for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) since lymphoblastic lymphoma and ALL are considered different manifestations of the same biologic disease. (Refer to the PDQ summary on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment for more information.) Treatment is usually patterned after ALL. Intensive combination chemotherapy with CNS prophylaxis is the standard treatment of this aggressive histologic type of NHL. Radiation therapy is sometimes given to areas of bulky tumor masses. Since these forms of NHL tend to progress quickly, combination chemotherapy is instituted rapidly once the diagnosis has been confirmed.The most important aspects

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