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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

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Treatment of indolent lymphoma that comes back as aggressive lymphoma may include the following:

  • A clinical trial of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant.
  • A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy or stem cell transplant and radiation therapy.
  • A clinical trial of monoclonal antibody therapy.
  • A clinical trial of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with indolent, recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Aggressive, Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Treatment of aggressive, recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma may include the following:

  • Stem cell transplant.
  • Monoclonal antibody therapy with or without combination chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplant.
  • Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy.
  • A clinical trial of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplant.
  • A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy or stem cell transplant and radiation therapy.

Treatment of aggressive lymphoma that comes back as indolent lymphoma may include the following:

  • Chemotherapy.
  • Palliative therapy with low-dose radiation therapy to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with aggressive, recurrent adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During Pregnancy

Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During the First Trimester of Pregnancy

When aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma is diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy, medical oncologists may advise the patient to end her pregnancy so that treatment may begin. Treatment is usually chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy.

Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During the Second and Third Trimesters of Pregnancy

When possible, treatment should delayed until after an early delivery, so that the anticancer drugs or radiation therapy will not affect the fetus. However, sometimes the cancer will need to be treated right away to increase the mother's chance of survival.

Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma During Pregnancy

Women who have indolent (slow-growing) non-Hodgkin lymphoma can usually delay treatment with watchful waiting.

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WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

Last Updated: February 25, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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