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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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Stages of Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

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    There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.

    The three ways that cancer spreads in the body are:

    • Through tissue. Cancer invades the surrounding normal tissue.
    • Through the lymph system. Cancer invades the lymph system and travels through the lymph vessels to other places in the body.
    • Through the blood. Cancer invades the veins and capillaries and travels through the blood to other places in the body.

    When cancer cells break away from the primary (original) tumor and travel through the lymph or blood to other places in the body, another (secondary) tumor may form. This process is called metastasis. The secondary (metastatic) tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if breast cancer spreads to the bones, the cancer cells in the bones are actually breast cancer cells. The disease is metastatic breast cancer, not bone cancer.

    The following stages are used for childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma:

    Stage I

    cdr0000614610.jpg
    Stage I childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Cancer is found in one group of lymph nodes or one area outside the lymph nodes, but no cancer is found in the abdomen or mediastinum (area between the lungs).

    In stage I childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer is found:

    • in one group of lymph nodes; or
    • in one area outside the lymph nodes.

    No cancer is found in the abdomen or mediastinum (area between the lungs).

    Stage II

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    Stage II childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Cancer is found in one area outside the lymph nodes and in nearby lymph nodes (a); or in two or more areas above (b) or below (c) the diaphragm; or cancer started in the stomach, appendix, or intestines (d) and can be removed by surgery.

    In stage II childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer is found:

    • in one area outside the lymph nodes and in nearby lymph nodes; or
    • in two or more areas above or below the diaphragm, and may or may not have spread to nearby lymph nodes; or
    • to have started in the stomach or intestines and can be completely removed by surgery. Cancer may or may not have spread to certain nearby lymph nodes.
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